Study Looks At How ‘Climate Reshuffling’ Since 1980s Has Impacted Salmon Productivity In Alaska, B.C., Washington

October 3rd, 2019

Traditionally it was thought that warm coastal water temperatures in Alaska were considered beneficial for salmon productivity, while the opposite was true off the coasts of British Columbia and Washington State where warmer temperatures were not as good for salmon.

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Did 1964 Alaska Earthquake, Tsunamis Lead To Mysterious (Sometimes Fatal) Tropical Fungal Outbreak In Pacific Northwest?

October 3rd, 2019

The Great Alaskan Earthquake of 1964 and the tsunamis it spawned may have washed a tropical fungus ashore, leading to a subsequent outbreak of often-fatal infections among people in coastal regions of the Pacific Northwest, according to a paper co-authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the nonprofit Translational Genomics Research Institute.

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Council Reduces Science Review Panel’s (ISAB) Budget, Says No Impact To Work: Cost Savings Might Go To Pike Suppression

September 19th, 2019

The annual budget for a panel of scientists that review fish and wildlife projects and regional research issues was cut by almost $200,000 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council at its meeting in Corvallis, Sept. 18, and the cost savings could be used for Northern pike monitoring and suppression, according to Council staff.

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Research Collaboration Shows Rapid Decline Of Hoary Bat, Victim Of Wind Power, In PNW; Provides Pollination, Pest Control

September 11th, 2019

The hoary bat, the species of bat most frequently found dead at wind power facilities, is declining at a rate that threatens its long-term future in the Pacific Northwest, according to a novel and comprehensive research collaboration based at Oregon State University – Cascades (Bend).

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Study Stresses Importance Of Prey Availability For Coho Smolts As Streams Warm

September 11th, 2019

To a certain extent, coho salmon smolts can withstand temperatures somewhat higher than previously thought to be optimal for survival and growth, and, in fact, will even grow faster and larger in higher temperatures, although survival may drop. However, the important variable in their growth over summer periods is the availability and abundance of invertebrate prey for the young salmon to eat, according to a recent study.

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