Study Shows Reproductive Potential Of Chinook Salmon Reduced 24-35 Percent As Returning Fish Younger, Smaller

June 25th, 2020

Adult chinook salmon are returning from the ocean to rivers along North America’s West Coast at younger ages and smaller sizes (about 5 to 8 percent in the Yukon River) since the 1970s. The smaller size is resulting in a drop in reproductive potential for female salmon by 24 to 35 percent, based on total egg mass per female, according to a recent study.

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Vancouver Island Sea Otter Recovery; Study Shows Financial Benefits, Ecological Changes Benefitting Salmon

June 18th, 2020

Since their reintroduction to the Pacific coast in the 1970s, the sea otters' rapid recovery and voracious appetite for tasty shellfish such as urchins, clams and crabs has brought them into conflict with coastal communities and fishers, who rely on the same valuable fisheries for food and income.

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Ocean Warming, Hatchery Fish Crowding In North Pacific Reducing British Columbia Sockeye Survival

May 29th, 2020

The northeast Pacific Ocean from the Fraser River to the Bering Sea is warming, but it is also becoming more crowded with hatchery pink and chum salmon produced in Alaska and Russia. The competition for food by hatchery pink salmon in a warming ocean has resulted in a 15 percent drop in survival of sockeye salmon returning to the Fraser River and other streams in British Columbia, according to a study released this week.

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