Study Looking At 65 Years Of Puget Sound Hatchery Practices Questions Trend Toward Releasing Larger Juvenile Fish

November 21st, 2019

A recent study examining salmon hatchery operations practices in the Salish Sea (Puget Sound) in Washington State for the past 65 years finds that current practices are releasing juvenile salmon at a larger size than in the past – a size preferred by predators – and with decreasing diversity. It calls for a consideration of modifying hatchery programs to allow for more diversity by reducing this size homogenization.

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Study: Laundered Clothes Bringing Microplastics To Oysters, Clams On Oregon Coast Through Wastewater

November 13th, 2019

Tiny threads of plastics are showing up in Pacific oysters and razor clams along the Oregon coast -- and the yoga pants, fleece jackets, and sweat-wicking clothing that Pacific Northwesterners love to wear are a source of that pollution, according to a new Portland State University study.

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Science Panel Completes Review Of Report On Feasibility Of Reintroducing Anadromous Salmonids Above Grand Coulee Dam

November 7th, 2019

A panel of scientists completed a review of the Upper Columbia United Tribes’ phase 1 report that describes the feasibility of reintroducing salmon and steelhead into the reaches of the Columbia River upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams.

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Grande Ronde River Study Shows How Adding Fish Carcasses (With Eggs) Improves Juvenile Salmon,Steelhead Growth Rates

November 7th, 2019

The addition of steelhead carcasses to tributaries of the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon resulted in short-term increases in the growth rates, body condition and size of juvenile chinook salmon and steelhead, factors that may contribute to their survival, according to a recent study.

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Middle Fork Salmon River: ‘Shifting Baseline Syndrome’ Skews Wilderness River’s True Abundance Potential For Spring/Summer Chinook

October 31st, 2019

Natural abundance potential of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Middle Fork Salmon River of Idaho recalculated by three biologists is far higher than most current management goals for the fish by NOAA Fisheries, the Nez Perce Tribe and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, according to a recent study.

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