Marine Heatwaves Continue To Dominate Northeast Pacific; Researchers Asking If New Normal

December 11th, 2020

During the summer of 2020, an area of unusually warm ocean water—a marine heatwave—grew off the West Coast of the United States. It became the second most expansive Northeast Pacific heatwave since monitoring began in 1982. The heatwave eventually encompassed about 9.1 million square kilometers, almost six times the size of Alaska, towards the end of September.

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Study: Wild Chinook Spawning Later In A Warming River, While Hatchery Strays Spawning Earlier

September 24th, 2020

Spawn timing for wild chinook salmon in the Skagit River system in Washington is slowly occurring later in the year as the river warms due to climate change, a finding that fits with previous research. However, the trend for hatchery-origin stray chinook salmon in the same river is towards earlier spawning, according to a recent study.

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Same Ocean Conditions Impacting West Coast Salmon Runs Reducing Population Of ESA-Listed Marbled Murrelet; Numbers Dropping 4 Percent A Year

September 24th, 2020

Squeezed by changing ocean conditions that limit their food options and the long-term loss of old forest needed for nesting, marbled murrelets would benefit most from conservation efforts that take both ocean and forest into account, new research by Oregon State University shows.

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