Trapping, Removing Larger Salmon-Eating Steller Sea Lions ( 2500 lbs) For First Time Requires Larger Barge, Cages; BPA Says Funding Approved, Still Need Building

October 16th, 2020

Confronted with trapping and euthanizing salmon-eating sea lions that are sometimes twice the size of California sea lions, states and tribes are upgrading equipment and procedures to begin capturing the larger Steller sea lions in the Bonneville Dam tailrace and at Willamette Falls, and eventually in Columbia River tributaries.

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Sea Lion Removal In Columbia/Willamette River To Restart In October Under New Rules: Now Includes Stellers, Area- Based Rather Than Individual Animal

September 25th, 2020

Sea lion removal at Bonneville Dam and Willamette Falls will restart in October, but with a twist that allows tribes and states to capture and euthanize far more sea lions, including both California and Steller sea lions, and to target sea lions in the lower Willamette River and from the I-205 bridge on the Columbia River upstream to McNary Dam, as well as the river’s tributaries.

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Due To COVID-19, BPA’s Northern Pikeminnow Reward Program On Track For Lowest Harvest On Record; Season Extended, Bounty Payments Increased

September 24th, 2020

Likely due to the Covid-19 pandemic, and recent smokey skies, the number of anglers this year participating in the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program is down 28 percent from this time last year. Currently, the 2020 harvest of northern pikeminnow on the Columbia and Snake rivers is on track to be the lowest on record.

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Science Panel Suggests Task Force As Focal Point For Battling ‘Inevitable’ Spread Of Northern Pike In Columbia River Basin

August 13th, 2020

An independent science panel has suggested the creation of a regional task force to be the focal point for efforts to battle the spread of northern pike when the voracious predator “inevitably” spreads in the Columbia River downstream from Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams.

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