NOAA Fisheries Taking Comments On Clackamas Hatchery Spring Chinook Program, Moving From Segregated To Integrated Broodstock

August 6th, 2020

NOAA Fisheries is taking public comment on its proposal to issue an Endangered Species Act determination for the Clackamas Hatchery Spring Chinook Salmon program, which moved this year from a segregated to an integrated broodstock program. Natural-origin spring chinook salmon will be spawned at the hatchery to bolster the genetic diversity of the broodstock and reduce genetic divergence from the wild stock.

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Hatchery

Bacterial Outbreak Forces Euthanization Of 3.2 Million Fish At California Hatcheries

July 30th, 2020

Three California Department of Fish and Wildlife fish hatchery facilities in the eastern Sierra and Southern California have been battling a bacterial outbreak that has affected 3.2 million fish. Last week, after consultation with fish pathology experts and exhausting all avenues of treatment, CDFW announced that the fish, which are all trout, at the affected facilities must be euthanized in order to stop the spread of the outbreak.

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Decades-Old Snake River Hatcheries Underfunded For Infrastructure Needs; Produce 20 Million Juvenile Salmon/Steelhead Each Year

July 16th, 2020

A five-year plan for non-recurring maintenance needs and infrastructure fixes at aging 35-to-40-year-old Snake River hatcheries shows a budget that is $5 million short, raising the question of who pays, according to managers and operators at the hatcheries who laid out their funding needs at the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Fish and Wildlife Committee meeting Tuesday, July 14.

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Ocean Warming, Hatchery Fish Crowding In North Pacific Reducing British Columbia Sockeye Survival

May 29th, 2020

The northeast Pacific Ocean from the Fraser River to the Bering Sea is warming, but it is also becoming more crowded with hatchery pink and chum salmon produced in Alaska and Russia. The competition for food by hatchery pink salmon in a warming ocean has resulted in a 15 percent drop in survival of sockeye salmon returning to the Fraser River and other streams in British Columbia, according to a study released this week.

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