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Sea Lion Removal In Columbia/Willamette River To Restart In October Under New Rules: Now Includes Stellers, Area- Based Rather Than Individual Animal

September 25th, 2020

Sea lion removal at Bonneville Dam and Willamette Falls will restart in October, but with a twist that allows tribes and states to capture and euthanize far more sea lions, including both California and Steller sea lions, and to target sea lions in the lower Willamette River and from the I-205 bridge on the Columbia River upstream to McNary Dam, as well as the river’s tributaries.

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Fishery Managers Want Changes In Fall Lower Snake Flow Operations Outlined In New 2020 Salmon/Steelhead BiOp, Say Impacts ESA Fish Still Migrating

September 24th, 2020

Fishery managers this week asked dam operators to postpone zero nighttime flow operations at lower Snake River dams, effectively asking them to set aside an operation included in NOAA Fisheries’ 2020 biological opinion of the impacts on salmon and steelhead of the Columbia/Snake river power system and the Columbia River System Operator’s environmental impact statement even before the CRSO completes its record of decision.

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Due To COVID-19, BPA’s Northern Pikeminnow Reward Program On Track For Lowest Harvest On Record; Season Extended, Bounty Payments Increased

September 24th, 2020

Likely due to the Covid-19 pandemic, and recent smokey skies, the number of anglers this year participating in the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program is down 28 percent from this time last year. Currently, the 2020 harvest of northern pikeminnow on the Columbia and Snake rivers is on track to be the lowest on record.

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Study: Wild Chinook Spawning Later In A Warming River, While Hatchery Strays Spawning Earlier

September 24th, 2020

Spawn timing for wild chinook salmon in the Skagit River system in Washington is slowly occurring later in the year as the river warms due to climate change, a finding that fits with previous research. However, the trend for hatchery-origin stray chinook salmon in the same river is towards earlier spawning, according to a recent study.

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