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Latest CBB News > Archives > Dec 17, 1999
Dec 17, 1999

1. FEDS RELEASE SALMON RECOVERY DOCUMENTS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Federal agencies released a pair of documents today that they say represent
a first step toward resolving scientific uncertainties and contradictions,
and providing the economic analysis necessary to build a Columbia Basin
fish and wildlife recovery plan.
The documents include a study of options for improving conditions for
salmon and steelhead in the Lower Snake River and a Basinwide recovery
analysis that reveals serious extinction risks for Upper Columbia and Snake
River ...
Read More...  

2. CORPS EXPANDS ECONOMIC INFORMATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Breaching the four lower Snake River dams would increase the cost of
power, the cost to transport goods downriver from eastern Washington and
western Idaho and impact irrigators.  The costs would outweigh the
benefits, according to information released by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
this morning.
However, other alternatives to breaching that call for maximum transportation
of juvenile fish or adding major system improvements come with more benefits
than costs.  System ...
Read More...  

3. CONGRESS TO HOLD HEARINGS ON ALL HS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
In response to the release of two major federal reports on salmon recovery
options, two Northwest senators said they plan to hold hearings next year
and seek a regional consensus.
But one of them, Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, questioned the science used
by federal agencies to develop their "All-H Paper" on salmon recovery options
and the apparently inconsistent positions on dam removal among their scientists.
"I seriously question the science they have used," Crapo, who chairs
the fisheries,
Read More...  

4. NMFS ISSUES NO JEOPARDY ON DREDGING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The National Marine Fisheries Service this week issued a not likely
to jeopardize opinion on a Columbia River project to deepen 105 miles
of shipping channel from 40 to 43 feet.
To get the favorable opinion that allows the dredging project to move
forward, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had to commit to restoring more
than 5,000 acres of estuary wetlands over the next 10 years, monitor the
projects effects on endangered salmon, modify estuary flood gates and
open additional area up ...
Read More...  

5. NMFS SCIENTISTS LIST DREDGING CONCERNS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
An internal National Marine Fisheries Service document lists the concerns
the agencys Northwest Science Center has about the impact on salmon of
a proposal to deepen the Columbia River shipping channel by 3 feet.
In the Dec. 2 letter that addressed the Science Centers concerns about
the projects impacts on the Columbia River estuary, John Stein of the
Science Center said that even though deepening the channel is a difficult
project to evaluate, it still is one more action that degrades the
Read More...  

7. CDOG REVISES CIVIL RIGHTS COMPLAINT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A lower Columbia River group that opposes a proposed project to deepen
by 3 feet the lower 105 miles of the river revised its discrimination complaint
with the U.S. Department of Environmental Quality.
The Columbia Deepening Opposition Group filed an initial complaint with
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys office of civil rights in September. 
The complaint claims the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers channel deepening
proposal discriminates against low income and minority ...
Read More...  

8. SEATTLE SEMINAR CALLS FOR BASIN DECISIONS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Agency, tribal and interest group representatives and others gathered
at a Seattle legal seminar on Dec. 9 and 10 to discuss solutions to Columbia
River environmental issues, focusing on the restoration of salmon and steelhead
runs.
There was a consensus that a shift from the seemingly endless information
gathering and studying processes to taking decisive action is critical
to saving salmon and steelhead from extinction and maintaining the regions
control over management of the ...
Read More...  

9. NMFS ANNOUNCES PROPOSED 4(D) RULES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The National Marine Fisheries Service Tuesday took a step forward in
its efforts to conserve 14 evolutionary significant units (ESUs) of West
Coast salmon and steelhead populations listed as threatened under the Endangered
Species Act by announcing proposed 4(d)  rules for those populations.
NMFS will publish three proposed 4(d) rules in the Federal Register
in about two weeks.  One proposed rule will cover seven threatened
steelhead ESUs: Central California Coast, ...
Read More...  

10. CBB INTERVIEW: GARY JAMES, CBFWA
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
 
EDITORS NOTE: On a regular basis the CBB will be interviewing key participants
in efforts to protect and restore Columbia River Basin fish and wildlife
populations.
 
Fish and wildlife managers need to stop bickering and unify their stand
as they embark on the monumental task of subbasin planning, says Gary James,
new chairman of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authoritys Anadromous
Fish Managers Caucus.
CBFWA is a consortium of 13 basin tribes, the four state fish ...
Read More...  

11. FEDS EXPLAIN ALL-H PROCESS AT SPOKANE MEETING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The federal caucus members have not yet named a preferred alternative
in any of its fish and wildlife recovery planning processes.
Thats not the case for an audience that gathered Wednesday in Spokane
for an update on the caucus' "All-H's" working paper and other federal
works in progress. Most of those who spoke out said "save the dams."
Drafts of the federal caucus' All Hs (formerly 4-H) paper and the Corps
of Engineers Lower Snake River Juvenile Salmon Passage feasibility study
and ...
Read More...  

12. CONGRESS AND SALMON: YEAR IN REVIEW
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
In 1999, members of Congress got a taste of the raging Northwest controversy
over a proposal to remove four federal dams on the Snake River to rescue
endangered salmon.
 
But regional legislation that would have put Congress on record in
favor of retaining the dams did not come up for a vote or debate in the
full House or Senate, keeping the issue out of the limelight.
A coalition of environmental, fishing, tribal and taxpayer groups launched
a national campaign in favor of ...
Read More...  

13. THE STATES NWPPC: YEAR IN REVIEW
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Key dates and data rest in the new millennium for a number of planning
processes intended to propel the regions Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife
program down a new path.
The bulk of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1999 effort was focused
in three separate but related areas -- providing more scientific and financial
accountability in its fish and wildlife project selection process; building
a scientific framework on which to base an amended program; and then reshaping
the ...
Read More...  

14. FEDS AND FISH: YEAR IN REVIEW
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Though deadlines kept getting pushed further into the future, federal
agencies worked intently through much of 1999 to devise a long-term Columbia
Basin fish and wildlife recovery strategy, and a plan to pay for it.
While a strictly defined federal "1999 decision" is not imminent as
the year comes to a close, key elements were coming into public focus.
That decision process has been driven in large part by a 1995 biological
opinion which said Columbia-Snake river federal hydrosystem ...
Read More...  

15. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
:
On p. 5, the Friday, Dec 10,1999 CBB says "'Ever increasing populations
that allow ever-increasing harvests -- that's success,' Chapman said."
I said nothing of the kind.  As a matter of fact, my statement
was, when
asked what should be the measure of success for supplementation in
the
Hanford Reach, "Don't screw up the robust naturally-spawning
population."
Al Wright said that increased harvest and increased hatchery and natural
populations pointed to a successful hatchery ...
Read More...  

 

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