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Latest CBB News > Archives > Dec 10, 1999
Dec 10, 1999

1. POWER NEEDS COULD FORCE FISH FLOW CHANGES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A new study says increased demand on the Columbia Basin power supply
could reduce hydrosystem operators' flexibility to provide timely flows
that some say ease passage of migrating salmon and steelhead.
The study concludes the region, absent new generating capability, faces
a high risk of experiencing wintertime power shortages.
The study says there is a 24 percent probability there will be times
during the next few winters when the region's demand for electricity will
outstrip the ...
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2. GOVERNORS ENDORSE DREDGING, WITH CONDITIONS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Oregon and Washington governors believe deepening the Columbia River
channel is justified economically, but say the environmental impacts of
the dredging operation must be addressed before the project begins.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released its final recommendation in
August 1999 to deepen the lower 105 miles of the Columbia River channel
from 40 feet to 43 feet to aid shipping in the region. According to the
Corps, a deeper channel will accommodate deeper draft ships and ...
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3. OREGON DEQ TACKLES DREDGING WATER QUALITY
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is studying the impacts
on water quality of deepening the Columbia River channel from Portland
to the coast. What DEQ decides could determine whether the channel project
will be allowed to go forward.
DEQ will host two hearings next week in Portland and Astoria to take
public input on how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers planned project to
deepen 105 miles of shipping channel will impact water quality in the river.
The Corps applied to ...
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4. COUNCIL APPROVES ANOTHER $18 MILLION IN PROJECTS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Northwest Power Planning Council this week recommended that $18.6
million worth of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife restoration projects
be funded with Bonneville Power Administration revenues, adding to the
$119 million previously approved.
Hatchery projects and phase-out funding for the scientific analytical
team PATH (See story No. 5 below) received the Council's blessing Tuesday,
pushing planned "direct program spending" to about $137.6 million for the
fiscal year that began ...
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5. COUNCIL SLASHES PATH FUNDING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Northwest Power Planning Council Tuesday decided to phase-out funding
for the multi-agency Columbia Basin salmon science team known as PATH --
Plan for Analyzing and Testing Hypotheses.
The broad-based group of scientists had asked for nearly $2 million
to fund seven projects and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority
had recommended that $1.67 million be spent. The Councils Independent
Science Review Panel, however, said that the group had outlived its usefulness
and ...
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6. ISAB PREFERS NMFS NEW MODEL OVER PATH
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The National Marine Fisheries Service has reached a fork in the road
as it prepares a biological assessment of alternatives for Lower Snake
River hydrosystem configuration.
And it appears at first blush that NMFS should follow the road its own
scientists are building rather than one created by PATH, according to a
panel of scientists.
The Independent Scientific Advisory Board was called on this summer
to review the analytical methods on which NMFS based its draft Anadromous
Fish Appendix
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7. PIT TAG STUDY MEASURES FISH SURVIVAL AT DAMS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Spill regimes and dam passage technology appear to be achieving the
goal of minimizing direct mortality for juvenile salmon migrating down
through the Snake-Columbia river hydropower system, according to an ongoing
study.
The average reach or per dam survival in 1999 for both yearling chinook
salmon and steelhead stayed in an elevated range first reached in 1995,
according to Bill Muir, principal researcher for the National Marine Fisheries
Service's survival study. That range is from ...
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8. STANDING QUESTIONS OVER SUPPLEMENTATION DISCUSSED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A group of experts Wednesday agreed to disagree in the long-running
debate over the role of hatchery "supplementation" in Columbia Basin fish
recovery efforts.
But most of the panelists called together by the Northwest Power Planning
Council did agree on the need to focus research efforts to validate claims
of supplementation's benefits or risks.
Dr. Brian Riddell of Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans concluded
the two-hour discussion of supplementation by noting literally ...
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9. GRANT PUD MANAGES FLOWS FOR REDDS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Winter river flow downstream from Priest Rapids dams has been set at
a level that is expected to protect chinook egg beds throughout the Hanford
Reach in central Washington.
According to Grant County PUD, it is coordinating the effort among mid-Columbia
River dam operators to ensure chinook egg beds are covered with water until
the eggs hatch in spring 2000. A river level of 60,000 cubic feet per second
was determined by a survey of redds in the 1.5 mile section of river below
the dam ...
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10. GROUPS ASK NMFS TO LIST LOWER COLUMBIA COHO
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Two Oregon conservation groups asked the National Marine Fisheries Service
to take another look at listing as endangered lower Columbia River coho
salmon resident in the Sandy and Clackamas rivers near Portland.
After learning from NMFS staff in Portland that they did not have enough
time or staff to do the work required to consider listing the species under
the federal Endangered Species Act, Oregon Trout and the Native Fish Society
both sent letters to NMFS asking the agency to ...
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11. FRAMEWORK ANALYSIS DUE IN JANUARY
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Northwest Power Planning Council was teased Wednesday with "very
preliminary" cost estimates of seven alternative fish and wildlife management
strategies developed through its Columbia River Basin Multi-Species Framework
process, but have yet to receive results from the ongoing analysis.
A "snapshot" of the results of the biological or ecological analysis
will be produced by the end of December or early January, according to
Roy Sampsel, Framework project manager.
To follow will ...
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