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Latest CBB News > Archives > Dec 4, 1998
Dec 4, 1998

1. BASIN HATCHERY POLICY SHIFT SUGGESTED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Columbia Basin fisheries would be better off in the long-run if hatchery
managers shifted to approaches that more closely mimicked nature's own
way of replenishing stocks, according to a report released Wednesday.

Much of past hatchery management policy has resulted in "short-term
benefit -- long-term disadvantage," according to Dr. Ernie Brannon
of the University of Idaho.

The 77-page Science Review Team "report on the state of the science"
of artificial ...
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2. FRAMEWORKERS DISCUSS DEVELOPING ALTERNATIVES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Columbia Basin Multi-Species Framework development process continues
into its next phase with trust-building as lively a pursuit as the collection
of biological, economic and social data.

Framework staff on Monday presented five sketches of basin fish and
wildlife management alternatives to the diverse membership of the framework
management committee. The goal of the process is to define a set of management
alternatives that can be analyzed to determine potential impacts of ...
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3. LAWSUIT AIMED AT ASSURING TERN RELOCATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Idaho Steelhead and Salmon Unlimited, the Northwest Sport Fishing Industry
Association and several Idaho sportsmen are suing the Army Corps of Engineers
and others to force the agencies to act on a plan to move Caspian terns
in the Columbia River estuary.

The lawsuit calls for the Corps, the National Marine Fisheries Service,
the Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Fish & Wildlife to move the 10,000
breeding pairs of terns off Rice Island, to eliminate the threat to ...
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4. SALMON CONCERNS HALT GOLD DREDGING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The state of Oregon has notified dredge miners that certain streams
will be off limits at least until May 1, when the Department of Environmental
Quality is expected to issue a revised permit addressing mining operations'
potential impacts on salmon populations.

The memo was sent out Nov. 23 to as many as 1,000 miners registered
under the general permit, as well as to other interested parties. It advises
them to stop mining in streams judged to have temperature-related water
quality ...
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5. STRONG TO LEAVE CRITFC IN MARCH
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Ted Strong, executive director of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish
Commission for 10 years, will leave office in March 1999.

Strong said he has decided to move back to the Yakama Reservation. "When
I came to the Commission, I expected to stay for about three years,"
he said. "The tribal members who encouraged me to accept this position
gave me all the reason in the world to want to succeed. My board, the commissioners,
gave me the greatest support and highest ...
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6. HANFORD REACH SPAWNERS GET PROTECTIVE FLOWS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Grant County Public Utility District last week extended protective
flow levels from its Priest Rapids Dam for an additional week to protect
late-spawning fall chinook egg nests, or "redds," in the Hanford
Reach.

And from this week until June, Grant PUD hopes to hold flows at 60,000
cubic feet per second (cfs), rather than the required 55,000 cfs, in order
to better protect the eggs through incubation and emergence.

"Our November 22 observations of continued ...
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7. FISH COUNT MYSTERY POINTS TO DALLES LADDER
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
There may be a problem with one of the fish ladders at the Dalles Dam
on the Columbia River.

According to counts of adult salmon compiled by the Army Corps of Engineers
nearly 45,000 more steelhead and 1,000 more sockeye were counted at John
Day Dam than at the Dalles.

The discrepancy is curious since adult salmon returning to spawn must
pass over the project at the Dalles before they reach John Day Dam some
24 miles up river.

After reviewing tapes at both dams Corps ...
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8. STUDY: DAMS SHOW BIGGEST IMPACT ON WATER TEMPS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Dams, not in-flows from tributary streams, have the biggest impact on
water temperatures in the Columbia/Snake river mainstem, according to preliminary
study results previewed Thursday in Portland.

That assessment, based on a modeling exercise, was announced during
the first day of the two-day Columbia/Snake River Mainstem Water Temperature
Workshop.

The gathering, sponsored by a variety of federal, state and tribal entities,
was designed as an exchange of information and ideas on how
Read More...  

9. PUBLIC COMMENT EXTENDED ON COLUMBIA DREDGING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The period for the public to comment on the Army Corps of Engineers'
plan to deepen 115 miles of the lower Columbia and Willamette River was
extended 60 days by the Corps from Dec. 7, 1998 to Feb. 5, 1999.

"We received 18 formal requests from members of the public, public
interest groups and other agencies to extend the comment period,"
said Dawn Edwards, a Corps spokeswoman. "Extending the period is a
response to their needs."

She said commenters asking for an ...
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10. FISH FRIENDLY TURBINE THEORIES TO BE TESTED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A turbine now being installed at Bonneville Dam is expected to produce
the first full-scale test of a new design that could, in theory, both enhance
survival of migrating juvenile salmon and be a more efficient generator
of electricity.

Dick Fisher of Voith Hydro briefed the Northwest Power Planning Council
Tuesday on innovative turbine technologies being developed. Fisher is vice
president-technology for Voith, one of the nation's largest manufacturers
of hydroelectric turbines. ...
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11. USFWS LOOKS AT LISTING REDBAND TROUT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that Great Basin redband
trout, a species native to southeastern Oregon and parts of California
and Nevada, may warrant listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered
Species Act.

In addition, the Service is seeking information on Interior redband
trout, which occur in streams, lakes and marshes in eastern Oregon and
Washington, western Idaho, northwestern Nevada and northern California.
The Great Basin redband trout is a ...
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12. COUNCIL STUDIES POWER SHORTAGE ISSUES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Periods of extreme winter weather and low Columbia River flows, combined
with energy deregulation, could leave the Northwest short of power, says
a recent analysis by the Northwest Power Planning Council.

As a result, the Council has appointed a 17-member advisory committee
of energy industry experts to assist the Council in identifying alternative
policies to address the problem. The work will be coordinated with an effort
by an association of electricity transmission line owners in the
Read More...  

13. PATH BRIEFING SET FOR DEC. 16
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The scientific team known as PATH -- Plan for Testing Alternative Hypotheses
-- will present its final report for 1998 on Dec. 16 during a briefing
at the Northwest Power Planning Council's Portland office from 1-4 p.m.

Organizers of the briefing are encouraging participation by regional
tribal and agency policymakers, environmental leaders, utility and industrial
interests and the interested public. Those wishing to participate by phone
should call 503-326-7665.

PATH will present its
Read More...  

 

The Columbia Basin Bulletin, Bend, Oregon. For information or comments call 541-312-8860.
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