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Latest CBB News > Archives > Oct 30, 1998
Oct 30, 1998

1. SCT COMPLETES MAINSTEM PROJECT RANKING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
More than 40 percent of the funds allocated for 1999 Columbia/Snake
mainstem projects intended to improve fish passage has been earmarked for
the effort to reduce juvenile salmon mortality at Bonneville Dam. The multi-agency
System Configuration Team on Monday (Oct. 26) completed its ranking of
projects proposed for fiscal year 1999 under the Corps of Engineers' Columbia
River Fish Mitigation Program. The panel recommended $81.26 million in
spending on a list of 47 projects involving ...
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2. CORPS RELEASES PLAN TO RELOCATE TERNS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Army Corps of Engineers released an environmental assessment for
public review Wednesday that outlines a plan to relocate the largest Caspian
tern colony in North America in an attempt to reduce predation on juvenile
salmon in the Columbia River estuary. If approved, the Corps will attempt
to move the tern colony, which is estimated at 10,000 breeding pairs, from
an 8-acre site on the west end of Rice Island, a manmade dredge spoil disposal
island at river mile 21, to East Sand ...
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3. POLITICS, SCIENCE OF NON-NATIVE PREDATORS DISCUSSED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A workshop looking at the presence and predatory habits of non-native
fish species introduced into the Columbia Basin's river and lake ecosystems
ended Wednesday with a smattering of science mixed with real-world politics.


Titled "Management Implications of Co-occurring Native and Introduced
Fishes," the workshop was sponsored by the Sustainable Fisheries Division
of the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Oregon Department of Fish
and Wildlife. It promised good science
Read More...  

4. WARMWATER SPECIES GAINING ANGLERS' FAVOR
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Fishery managers across the West face ever-more crucial choices as they
try to maximize anglers' pleasure while minimizing impacts of non-resident
fish on a growing list of threatened or endangered species.

That was the consensus of experts who presented their perspectives Tuesday
afternoon at a workshop titled "Management Implications of Co-occurring
Native and Introduced Fishes." Hosts for the Portland workshop were
the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the National
Read More...  

5. JOHN DAY DRAWDOWN STUDY LAUNCHED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The potential for enhancing salmon survival with major operational or
structural changes at John Day Dam will be explored through a yearlong,
$3.3 million study launched this year by the Corps of Engineers.

The congressionally mandated study is intended to analyze mostly existing
information on the estimated economic costs and biological benefits of
two drawdown scenarios. The first is called spillway crest drawdown, from
the reservoir's normal operating level of 265 feet above sea level
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6. BODI, BPA SHARE FISH AND WILDLIFE GOALS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Environmental activist-turned-power agency adviser? It's not such an
odd career twist as many imagine, Lorri Bodi told a gathering of Columbia
River Basin fish and wildlife managers Wednesday evening.

Bodi and her employer of eight weeks, the Bonneville Power Administration
share a vision -- the need to establish a regional plan to restore Basin
fish and wildlife populations.

"I've been grappling with that for the 20 years I've been hanging
around," Bodi told ...
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7. NMFS REGIONAL CHIEF URGES CONSENSUS BUILDING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
By presenting a united front, the region increases the chances that
its voice will be heard when it comes time to make key decisions regarding
management of the Columbia River Basin, says Will Stelle, Northwest regional
administrator for the National Marine Fisheries Service. NMFS, in a 1995
biological opinion, specified that changes in operations for the federal
Columbia-Snake river hydroelectric system are necessary to improve in-river
survival of Snake River salmon species listed ...
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8. CORPS RELEASES CHANNEL DREDGING STUDY
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
An Army Corps of Engineers draft report out for public comment assesses
the costs and impacts of deepening nearly 115 miles of Columbia and Willamette
River navigable waters by three feet to accomodate a growing fleet of larger
ships visiting seven ports along the two rivers.

The dredging and other activities would cost over $175 million and produce
more than 19 million cubic yards (mcy) of sand, silt and rock for disposal,
but, according to the report, it would not adversely affect ...
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9. PATH 1998 REPORT DUE OUT IN DECEMBER
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The scientific group called PATH (Plan for Analyzing and Testing Hypotheses),
will release its final report for Fiscal Year 1998 this December. The report
will cover hypotheses concerning recovery of endangered and threatened
stocks of Snake River spring/summer chinook, as well as preliminary analyses
for Snake River fall chinook and steelhead.

PATH organizers this week have been discussing how best to release the
report. Options now include first presenting the report to the ...
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10. DUNCAN TO HEAD NEW ENVIRONMENTAL FOUNDATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Former Northwest Power Planning Council chairman Angus Duncan has been
named executive director of the fledgling Bonneville Environmental Foundation.


The Foundation was created last summer under a cooperative venture involving
conservation organizations -- Renewable Northwest Project, Natural Resources
Defense Council, and Northwest Energy Coalition -- and the Bonneville Power
Administration.

The three environmental groups endorse select, environmentally preferred
resources. ...
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11. COMMISSION: NATURAL RIVER BEST BIOLOGICAL CHOICE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The five-state Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission this month
adopted a resolution declaring that "current information indicates
natural river option" is the "best biological choice" for
recovery of wild Snake River salmon and steelhead stocks.

The commission, noting that "biology is only one component of a
long-term recovery plan," urged decision makers to shift the debate
from biology to economics.

The PSFMC is an interstate commission with ...
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12. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
of Washington Department of Fish and Game regarding
the story in Oct. 23 CBB on Ives Island flow augmentation proposal:

In the article, I was quoted as saying that the proposal put forward
by Washington, Oregon and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to provide augmented
flows for fall chinook spawning below Bonneville would pose zero added
impact to the power system and Biological Opinion. What I meant was that
the action taken by NMFS and BPA (intentionally reducing flows to ...
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