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Latest CBB News > Archives > Oct 23, 1998
Oct 23, 1998

1. SCT REMAINS SPLIT ON PROJECT PRIORITIES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
More money flooded into the Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program this
week, but it did not buy consensus on 1999 Corps of Engineers construction
priorities at Columbia and Snake River dams.

The System Configuration Team on Wednesday did reach compromise in one
area, endorsing a modified proposal for further testing of extended length
screens at John Day Dam.

But the group composed of both state and federal officials was forced
to come back another day -- Monday, Oct. 26 -- to decide
Read More...  

2. FEDS REJECT PROPOSAL TO AID SPAWNERS BELOW BONNEVILLE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
After weeks of talks, the Bonneville Power Administration and National
Marine Fisheries Service rejected a proposal to provide minimum flows to
protect a naturally spawning population of fall chinook below Bonneville
Dam.

State and federal fish managers say Bonneville, with the National Marine
Fisheries Service's agreement, is actually shaping operations to eliminate
the spawners from the area around Ives, Pierce, and Hamilton Islands in
the mainstem Columbia.

Although the issue was
Read More...  

3. FEDS, STATES, TRIBES MULL MOA SIGNING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Some votes are in, but most are still undecided as federal, state and
tribal officials consider signing a proposed "memorandum of agreement"
to create a regional forum for addressing Columbia Basin fish and wildlife
issues.

At least two key participants, the states of Idaho and Montana, have
a adopted a "wait-and-see" position. Representatives say their
governors view the forum as a potential short-term tool to facilitate fish
and wildlife restoration ...
Read More...  

4. ICBEMP SURVIVES, GETS NEW DIRECTION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
During federal budget negotiations, congressional Republicans backed
off plans to kill funding for the six-state Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem
Management Project, while the Administration agreed to delay and scale
back the project so it is "more sensitive to local concerns."

The threat of a veto of the omnibus spending bill, which included the
Interior Appropriations bill, prompted a reconsideration of efforts to
cut funding for ICBEMP, said Rep. Rick Hill, ...
Read More...  

5. FARMERS OFFERED SALMON RESTORATION CASH
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Farmers in Oregon and Washington are being offered cash to idle streamside
acreage and improve its value as habitat for salmon and trout listed under
the Endangered Species Act.

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber and Washington Gov. Gary Locke made separate
announcements during this past week that their states have entered into
partnerships with the federal government that could steer up to $500 million
toward the protection of salmon and trout-bearing streams.

The agreements take ...
Read More...  

6. GRAND COULEE GAS ABATEMENT OPTIONS WEIGHED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The government will get what it is willing to pay for in terms of dissolved
gas abatement at Grand Coulee Dam, according to a recently completed analysis
of structural alternatives being studied by the Bureau of Reclamation.

Among the conceptual-level designs studied, there seems to be an inverse
relationship between the projected success in gas abatement and the cost,
according to Kathy Frizell, a Bureau hydraulic engineer who co-authored
the report presented Wednesday in Portland ...
Read More...  

7. FUNDS EXPAND TERMINAL FISHERIES PROGRAM
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Northwest Power Planning Council last week approved the use of $300,000
in Bonneville Power Administration funds to expand a terminal fisheries
program in the lower Columbia River. The money will be used during the
1999 fiscal year to add 12 net pens at one of the four existing net pens
sites -- Deep River, which is about nine miles east of Astoria on the Washington
side of the Columbia -- and place 12 pens in a new site at Steamboat Slough,
which is about 10 miles farther east. ...
Read More...  

8. FRAMEWORK ALTERNATIVES WORKSHOP SET
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A scientist known worldwide for work with endangered species has been
called upon to trigger the search for the appropriate management strategies
for Columbia Basin fish and wildlife recovery.

Dr. Ulysses Seal of the World Conservation Union will facilitate a workshop
Nov. 17-19 that is designed, ultimately, to begin scientific and socio-economic
analysis of proposed management alternatives for fish and wildlife restoration
in the basin. The workshop is scheduled at the Portland ...
Read More...  

9. PORTLAND'S RESPONSE TO ESA LISTING DETAILED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
With the March 1998 ESA listing of Columbia River Basin steelhead, Portland
became the first major metropolitan area to have a threatened species in
the heart of the city.

But city officials aren't fighting the ESA's requirements, City Commissioner
Erik Sten says.

"We're not waiting to see what others will do, and we're not pointing
fingers -- we want to restore our watersheds. We'd like to come up with
a plan of action that responds to both the Endangered Species Act and ...
Read More...  

10. CONFERENCE TO FOCUS ON WATER TEMPERATURE ISSUES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The effects of water temperature upon salmon and steelhead in the Columbia
River Basin will be the focus of a two-day workshop in December sponsored
by the Environmental Protection Agency.

"Temperature has a tremendously important impact on fish survival,"
said Mary Lou Scoscia, Columbia River coordinator for EPA. "This workshop
is aimed at helping us get a better understanding of the effects of temperature
upon fish health."

The EPA says that most of the ...
Read More...  

11. TECHNICAL TEAM MEETS ON HANFORD STRANDING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A "technical team" has been formed to complete a study that
will guide fish and power managers in implementing hydropower operations
that will reduce juvenile fish stranding in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia
River.

Representatives of state and federal agencies, tribes, and mid-Columbia
Public Utility Districts met Thursday (Oct. 22) in Sea-Tac to discuss objectives
of the study, review past research and determine needed research.

They also began preliminary discussions of
Read More...  

12. PROJECT PROPOSAL PROCESS, SCHEDULE EVOLVES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Columbia Basin fish and wildlife managers and researchers are working
to "improve their proposals" for Northwest Power Planning Council
Fish and Wildlife Program funding.

And the principal drivers of that annual $127 million program are working
at the same time to "improve the process."

The Council and the Bonneville Power Administration earlier this month
issued a request for proposals for fiscal year 2000 funding. The request
was issued a month earlier than ...
Read More...  

13. CULVERT REPLACEMENT IMPROVES ACCESS FOR SPAWNING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Montana fisheries biologists say a BPA-funded culvert replacement project
at Hungry Horse Reservoir has been a hit with spawning trout.

Before-and-after surveys show an obvious increase in spawners using
previously inaccessible streams that flow into the reservoir, said Ladd
Knotek, a fisheries biologist with the state Department of Fish, Wildlife
and Parks.

Before, several of the streams presented nearly insurmountable obstacles
for fish aiming to swim upstream. One, called Felix ...
Read More...  

14. IDAHO IRRIGATION CANALS OPEN FOR FISHING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Idaho Fish and Game Department is inviting the public to harvest
fish trapped in irrigation canals along the Boise, Payette and Weiser rivers.


The trapped fish enter the full irrigation canals during spring and
summer, but when fall arrives and water flow into the canals is curtailed,
cutthroats and hatchery trout, along with rough fish, such as squaw fish
and suckers, are left high and dry.

"In the old days, before construction of the Hells Canyon dams,
we saw some ...
Read More...  

15. NEW APPOINTMENTS AT ODFW
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
George Buckner and Jack Graham were appointed to executive positions
at the Oregon Dept. of Fish & Wildlife.

Jim Greer, Director of ODFW, announced the appointments Oct. 12.

George Buckner was appointed Assistant Wildlife Division Chief. In that
position, he'll manage ODFW's habitat, game and wildlife diversity activities,
including moving the agency toward a watershed based approach to resource
management and addressing state and federal funding. Most recently, Buckner
held a ...
Read More...  

16. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
of Othello, Wa:

The article titled CONFERENCE TACKLES RIVER GOVERNANCE had comments
by Will Stelle, regional administrator for the National Marine Fisheries
Service.

Mr. Stelle's began his comments by clearly stating that water quality
is in continuous decline (in a manner that would put stink on all water
users). My guess was that he was implying that water quality declines must
be a major cause of the salmon problem. Later upon direct questioning about
the Columbia River and ...
Read More...  

 

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