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Latest CBB News > Archives > October 10, 2003
October 10, 2003

1. BIG FISH NUMBERS; BIG HARVEST; GOOD DEMAND, PRICES
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
A good news/bad news scenario for lower Columbia River mainstem gill netters has become heavily weighted on the good news side this late summer and fall with the demand, the price and the catch growing beyond expectations in recent weeks. Read More...  

2. SHARP DECLINE IN ESTUARY TERNS; STEEP RISE OF COMORANTS
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
Researchers this summer witnessed a sharp decline in the number of Caspian terns nesting on the Columbia River estuary's East Sand Island, though their diminished predatory presence was likely counterbalanced by an even more dramatic increase in the number of doubled-crested cormorants that share that locale. Read More...  

3. AGREEMENT MAY SETTLE CHANNEL DEEPENING CHALLENGE
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
A settlement between the Port of Vancouver and the Seattle-based Columbia River Alliance for Nurturing the Environment (CRANE) that will be announced later today could nullify the only remaining challenge to deepening the Columbia River shipping channel by 3 feet. Six lower Columbia River ports say the project is needed to accommodate deeper draft ships and for the ports to remain competitive. Read More...  

4. BONNEVILLE FINALIZES $31.5 MILLION IN MAINSTEM PROJECTS
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
A Bonneville Power Administration funding decision finalized late last week both squeezes and expands budgets, and ushers fish and wildlife projects on and off the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's recommendation list, in balancing the fiscal 2004-2006 budget for the mainstem/systemwide "province." Read More...  

5. PRELIMINARY REPORT DETAILS 2003 IN-RIVER FISH PASSAGE SURVIVAL
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
A preliminary report out of the NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle shows survival for juvenile salmon and steelhead through Snake and Columbia River reservoirs and dams this spring is near the 1995-2002 average. Read More...  

6. RIVER MANAGERS DEBATE LAKE PEND OREILLE DRAWDOWN
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
Debate began at this week's Technical Management Team meeting on whether the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers should complete this year a deep drawdown of Lake Pend Oreille to accommodate a 10-year study of the impacts of various fall and winter lake levels on kokanee spawning and on the lake's threatened bull trout population. Read More...  

7. MIGRATION NEARLY OVER, FEDS RAISE WATER AT LOWER GRANITE
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
A sign that spring and summer fish passage operations is ending at federal Snake and Columbia River dams is the final decision to discontinue operating the Lower Granite Dam reservoir at its minimum operating pool level. Read More...  

8. PUDS, TRIBES, STATE, NOAA STRIKE AGREEMENT ON STEELHEAD
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
Negotiations focused on steelhead recovery among two Mid-Columbia public utility districts, area tribes and the state of Washington have resulted in an unusual agreement that meshes hatchery and harvest management, as well as recovery monitoring and evaluation, on the upper Columbia River. Read More...  

9. WDFW ANNOUNCES UPPER COLUMBIA STEELHEAD FISHERY
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
With steelhead returns to the upper Columbia River expected to reach the second-highest level in 15 years, central Washington anglers can now catch hatchery fish with clipped adipose fins in the upper Columbia, Methow and Okanogan rivers. Read More...  

10. FALL CHINOOK NUMBERS HIGHEST SINCE 1942
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 (PST)
A continuing flood of salmon into lower Columbia River hatcheries has forced up estimates of the 2003 fall chinook return to a level not seen since at least 1942. Read More...  
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