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Latest CBB News > Archives > Oct 1, 1999
Oct 1, 1999

1. CONGRESS LIMITS BPA RATE CASE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Congress this week approved an amendment to the 1980
Northwest Power Act
that would prevent the Bonneville Power Administration
from setting
electricity rates for the years 2002-2006 so as to
build a "slush fund
for dam removal," the measure's author, Sen. Slade
Gorton, R-Wash.,
declared.
The measure would limit rates, which are currently
in the process of
being set by BPA, to a level that will cover the
fish and wildlife costs
that are projected to occur during the rate ...
Read More...  

2. JOHN DAY DRAWDOWN STUDY AWAITING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Corps of Engineers will await peer review of
analytical methods and
biological information before releasing its draft
Phase I John Day
drawdown study.
That preliminary biological information gives a slight
edge -- with
caveats-- to John Day drawdown as the alternative
providing the biggest
potential benefit for Columbia-Snake river salmon
populations.
The Phase I report will recommend to Congress whether
or not further
study of reservoir drawdowns behind John Day Dam
for ...
Read More...  

3. CORPS CLAIMS COOLER TEMPS SINCE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Water temperatures at lower Snake River dams are
cooler now than before
the dams were built and there is little more the
Corps can do to make
the water cooler, according to recent U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers
testimony in U.S. District Court.
Two Corps officials said historical water temperatures
in the lower
Snake River were warmer before the dams were built
than they are today
and that when temperatures do rise at the dams, it
is caused more by
warm inflows from the Snake ...
Read More...  

4. HATCHERY PRODUCTION REVIEW
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Northwest Power Planning Council members spent much
of the week in
Washington D.C. shopping around a nearly completed
document they hope
will be the blueprint for reform of the Columbia
Basin's costly
artificial production system.
The group that includes Council members Eric Bloch
of Oregon, Larry
Cassidy of Washington and Stan Grace of Montana is
seeking congressional
support for an evolving reform implementation recipe
that will require,
eventually, a large infusion of federal ...
Read More...  

5. TRIBAL, NON-INDIAN FISHING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Still-surging estimates of the 1999 upriver bright
fall chinook salmon
run allowed the Columbia River Compact to offer something
for everyone
Monday.
The Compact on Monday approved a one-day extension
of one non-Indian
commercial fishery and OK'd two others for next week.
The
Oregon-Washington compact, which sets mainstem Columbia
commercial
fisheries, also endorsed a tribal commercial fishery
Sept. 29-Oct. 2
And the states' two representatives to the Compact
agreed to reopen ...
Read More...  

6. GROUP RELEASES BREACHING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A study for American Rivers by a former
top Army Corps of Engineers
official concludes it is feasible and
desirable to replace the barge
shipping system on the lower Snake River
with other transportation
alternatives for grain and other commodities
after breaching four
federal dams.
Public and private investments in highway
and rail infrastructure would
keep grain transportation rates affordable
during and after dams are
removed, a project that would take eight
years, economist ...
Read More...  

7. CREST CHALLENGES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A council of governments in the lower Columbia
River says a U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers plan to deepen the
river channel three more feet will
cause environmental harm to endangered
fish and other aquatic species,
benefits only 5 percent of ships, does
not comply with federal or local
laws and, using the Corps' own estimates
of costs and benefits, does not
pencil out economically for more than
10 years.
CREST is preparing detailed comments on
the Corps' 8-volume, ...
Read More...  

8. CIVIL RIGHTS COMPLAINT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A lower Columbia River organization opposing
a $196 million project to
deepen the Columbia River from Portland
to the river's mouth filed a
civil rights complaint to stop the project.
The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers plans to deepen 115 miles of
the Columbia River and Willamette
River channels from Portland to the river's
mouth in order to
accommodate deeper draft ships.
The Columbia Deepening Opposition Group,
an organization concerned
mostly with environmental impacts of ...
Read More...  

9. FWS PURSUING LAKE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
 
By Jim Mann
A boat rigged with deep-water nets may
be plying the waters of Lake
McDonald by next spring, with the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service waiting
to see what comes up.
Wade Fredenberg, a fisheries biologist
with the agency, anticipates the
"experimental" netting would show that
Glacier's most famous lake is
choked with exotic lake trout, and that
native cutthroat and bull trout
have been displaced. It would also show
how effective netting techniques
imported from the
Read More...  

10. ECONOMIC BOARD
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Independent Economic Advisory Board
certified at its meeting in
Portland Thursday that it has completed
its review of the economic
reports associated with a U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers study on
breaching four Lower Snake River dams.
However, adding some of its own caveats
to wording provided by the
Corps, IEAB members said that signing
doesn't mean it is agreeing with
the final version of the Economic Appendix
to the Corps' Lower Snake
River Juvenile Salmon Migration ...
Read More...  

11. COUNCIL'S FRAMEWORK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The 1 1/2-year-old Multi-Species Framework
process has "cranked up the
engine" on a Battelle Laboratories' megacomputer
and staffers now await
the opportunity to interpret data that
predicts potential biological
impacts of seven proposed fish and wildlife
strategies.
The Framework's management committee heard
an update of the process
during a recent meeting in Spokane. The
seven strategies were distilled
from nearly 30 submitted by tribes, state
and federal agencies, ...
Read More...  

 

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