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Latest CBB News > Archives > Sep 17, 1999
Sep 17, 1999

1. HEARING DEBATES AT-RISK SPECIES SURVEYS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Even if Congress passes legislation to allow it to ignore two federal
court rulings to improve at-risk species surveys, the Clinton administration
would not use the authority, a Forest Service official testified on Thursday.
Northwest senators have included discretionary legal authority in the
FY2000 interior appropriations bill, which is expected to pass the Senate
next week.
Under President Clinton's 1994 Northwest Forest Plan for protecting
old-growth forest areas, federal land ...
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3. KITZHABER PUSHES GOVERNANCE PLAN
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber today (Sept. 17) was expected to ask his
fellow Northwest governors to help develop a plan to cement regional control
of both fish and wildlife recovery efforts and the Bonneville Power Administration.
Kitzhaber was scheduled speak to a Seattle City Club luncheon crowd
that was to include the governors of Idaho, Montana and Washington, according
to an Associated Press report.
The new governing entity envisioned by Kitzhaber would have the authority
to direct ...
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4. ADULT SOCKEYE RELEASED IN REDFISH LAKE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The governor of Idaho was among those on hand Wednesday to celebrate
the release of 21 adult sockeye salmon into Redfish Lake -- a signal of
success for a captive breeding program intended to revive a species listed
in 1991 as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.
The release witnessed by Gov. Dirk Kempthorne was the fifth into the
lake from the broodstock program.
But this year's release was different in that three of the 21 fish released
had made the 900-mile journey to the ocean
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5. FOREST PRACTICES REPORT ON SALMON RELEASED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A 90-page independent science report released this week offers 19 suggestions
for how Oregon forest practices on state and private lands could be improved
to facilitate the recovery of salmon species.
The report prepared by the seven member Independent Multidisciplinary
Science Team will be presented Sept. 23 to the Oregon Board of Forestry's
Ad Hoc Forest Practices Advisory Committee on Salmon and Watersheds.
The citizens' committee was formed to review protections contained in
the ...
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6. FISHING COMPACT WEIGHS FALL CHINOOK IMPACTS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Sport fishermen were put on hold in the Columbia River below Bonneville
this week until state and federal officials can reassess the size of the
incoming fall chinook run and the combined impact that the recreationists
and tribal and non-tribal commercial fishers have had to-date on listed
Snake River fall chinook.
Representatives from Oregon and Washington fish and wildlife commissions
agreed Sept. 10 to suspend the sport-fishing season from the river's mouth
at Buoy 10 to ...
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7. CORPS SALMON PROJECT LIST SHAPED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Poor scores from the Columbia Basin's 13 tribes pushed numerous Lower
Snake River dam passage projects to the bottom -- but not off -- of the
Corps of Engineers fiscal year 2000 priority list.
Corps officials are confident that enough money will be in hand to pay
for all of the proposed projects as they are now described.
The state and federal members of the multi-agency System Configuration
Team (SCT) are charged with ranking mainstem research and construction
projects proposed for ...
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8. TRIBAL MAINSTEM PROPOSALS PUT ON HOLD
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Members of the Regional Forum's System Configuration Team balked at
a request to squeeze new projects into the Corps of Engineers fiscal year
2000 Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program work plan, but did leave the
door slightly ajar.
Still, a spokesman for tribal interests at Wednesday's project priority-setting
session claimed no satisfaction.
"What's going to happen to the projects they (the 13 Columbia Basin
tribes) put on the table?" Bob Heinith asked SCT members. The tribes ...
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9. IF DAMS BREACHED, CORPS RETAINS EXPOSED LAND
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
If the four lower Snake River dams are breached, drawing down the four
reservoirs would expose about 14,000 acres of land and create a new 140-mile
long river corridor. For now, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says in
a real estate study, it will retain most of that land.
The Corps purchased the land between 1955 and 1979 while constructing
Ice Harbor, Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Dams. However,
in anticipation of building the dams, the purchase was authorized ten ...
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10. AUTHOR SAYS KGB TARGETED BASIN DAMS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Hungry Horse dam is safe, even if it was once a sabotage target for
Russian spies, assures a Bureau of Reclamation security specialist.
The dam, completed in 1952, was indeed a target during the Cold War,
according to Christopher Andrew, a British historian who has written a
book based on thousands of documents that were smuggled out of the Soviet
Union by defector Vasili Mitrokhin in 1992. Mitrokhin was an archivist
with the KGB, the Russian intelligence service.
The book and its details
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11. IDFG, CRITFC CRITICIZE A-FISH APPENDIX
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Two players in the Columbia Basin's salmon recovery effort have delivered
unsolicited, and unkind, reviews of the draft Anadromous Fish Appendix
prepared by the National Marine Fisheries Service.
Comments offered by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Columbia
River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission criticize the document's contents and
many of its conclusions, as well as the process used to compile the information.
The document is intended as the biological appendix to the U.S. ...
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12. PGE TESTS ALTERNATIVE HYDRO LICENSING PROCESS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Portland General Electric is testing a new hydroelectric relicensing
process at its Clackamas River projects that could save time in the long
run and encourage greater collaboration with interested parties along the
way.
PGE is only the second license applicant to use the new process, which
involves a third party contractor putting together an environmental impact
statement at the same time the utility puts together its license application.
The New York Power Authority is the only ...
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