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Latest CBB News > Archives > May 21, 1999
May 21, 1999

1. E-SCREEN, SMOLT MORTALITY LINK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Operations related to the testing
of prototype extended length screens are suspected as a cause of a spike
in mortality among juvenile salmon directed through John Day Dam's bypass
system.
Researchers on Monday told a multi-agency
technical panel that test operations of the screens seemed to mirror an
increase in mortality as measured at the dam's new $32 million smolt monitoring
facility. It was built so researchers could check the fishes' condition
following passage through the ...
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2. LOCALS LEERY OF MULTI-SPECIES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A group of Montanans got a glimpse
of the bureaucracy that manages the Columbia River system this week, and
some didn't like what they saw.
Speaking to a panel of federal, state
and tribal officials involved with the Multi-Species Framework process,
citizens at the Whitefish meeting Monday night were exasperated by the
complexity of the process. Some felt alienated, having just learned about
it.
"Where is all the direction coming
from? Where is the budget coming from? And what is ...
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3. BIOLOGIST BOLSTERS RESIDENT FISHES'
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Things are slowly improving for Northwest
Montana's resident fish, such as the bull trout, despite competition from
introduced species and despite their poor cousin status among Columbia
Basin fish and wildlife policy makers.
That's the assessment of Brian Marotz
of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. He has been involved
in efforts to implement the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Program
to improve fish habitat and passage
In a Tuesday presentation to ...
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4. COUNCIL RELEASES HATCHERY REVIEW
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A broad set of artificial production
policy recommendations intended to guide funding decisions was approved
by the Northwest Power Planning Council Wednesday for public review.
Implementation recommendations also
included in the document suggest processes for evaluating hatchery and
artificial production program performance and for deciding whether programs
should continue to be funded.
The document notes a 10-year trend
in the Columbia River Basin away from the historical approach ...
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5. TERNS CROWD RICE ISLAND, LAY
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The number of Caspian terns in the
Columbia River estuary is leveling out and the favored nesting spot continues
to be Rice Island. However, researchers continue to be optimistic that
the plan to move the birds will eventually work even though birds are building
nests and laying eggs and harassment tactics to move the birds off Rice
Island are ceasing.
Although an Army Corps of Engineers
compromise plan called for moving at least 80 percent of the birds from
the nations largest tern ...
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6. WILD FISH POLICY EXEMPTION BILL
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A bill that would exempt three Columbia
Basin tribes from Oregons Wild Fish Policy moved out of a legislative
committee this week and onto the House floor. If approved, the bill would
give the tribes authority to use hatchery supplementation to increase numbers
of salmon and steelhead and, some say, would circumvent processes already
in motion.
House Bill 3609, introduced by Rep.
Jason Atkinson,R-Jacksonville, passed out of the Joint Stream Restoration
and Species Enhancement ...
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7. LOCKE TO SIGN SALMON LEGISLATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Washington Gov. Gary Locke will sign
salmon recovery legislation that includes new logging regulations and the
creation of a citizens panel to oversee spending on state restoration projects.
Though the governors office is still
analyzing the legislation, Locke is thrilled that the forestry piece
made it through this weeks three-day special session, and he will sign
the bill, said Sandi Snell, a spokesperson for Locke.
The Forest and Fish Agreement would
increase streamside buffers, ...
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8. WASHINGTON PROPOSES NEW SHORELINE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Washington state is proposing changes
to 27-year-old rules that govern how individuals and communities can affect
the states stream, marine and lake shorelines. The proposed changes are
part of the states strategy for salmon recovery.
The proposal requires Washington
counties and cities to update their shoreline master plans to include stricter
rules for installing bulkheads that harm salmon habitat, for removing shoreline
plants that keep banks from eroding and create habitat for ...
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9. SMALL PUD ENDORSES DAM BREACHING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
An Oregon public utility endorsed
this week breaching the four lower Snake River dams saying that a return
to a free-flowing river would significantly restore endangered fish runs
in the entire Columbia River Basin.
The Emerald Public Utility District,
which serves about 17,000 customers in the southern Willamette Valley of
Oregon, claims to be the first electric utility in the country to endorse
removal of the four dams. Emerald believes there are reasonable and economic
solutions ...
Read More...  

10. NMFS PROPOSES CRITICAL HABITAT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The National Marine Fisheries Service
has scheduled ten workshops to take public comment on its proposals to
designate critical habitat for protected salmon and steelhead and to change
the listing status of Umpqua River cutthroat trout.
NMFS is proposing to designate certain
areas as critical habitat in the belief that special management of these
areas would have an impact on the health and restoration of endangered
species. It is proposing critical habitat for Oregon coast coho, and ...
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11. NPPC EYES BUDGET CUTS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Budget cuts continue, though at a
more relaxed pace than during the past two years, in fiscal year 2000 and
2001 proposals now being considered by the Northwest Power Planning.
The Council made a commitment in
1997 to cut its budget by nearly 25 percent, from $8 million to about $6.2
million, by 2002, according to Jim Tanner, the Council's administrative
officer.
About half of that reduction was
achieved during 1998 and 1999 by deferring contract requirements, restricting
travel, ...
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12. JURY'S STILL OUT ON DALLES SPILL
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Spring tests are still in midstream,
but preliminary numbers from spring spill tests at The Dalles are "not
too dissimilar from last year's data," according to the researcher in charge
of the fish survival study.
"We're right in the middle of our
field work" so results are far from conclusive," Earl Dawley told members
of the System Configuration Team. The SCT, a multi-agency team that helps
identify hydrosystem passage project funding priorities, heard research
updates at John Day, ...
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13. ISAB NOMINATION LIST MULLED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A "short list" of candidates to fill
four vacant positions on the Independent Scientific Advisory Board has
been forwarded to the Northwest Power Planning Council and the National
Marine Fisheries Service.
A list of nine scientists with expertise
in five different subject areas has been recommended by a National Research
Council nominations committee to serve on the ISAB. The terms of three
ISAB members, Rick Williams, Richard Whitney and Phil Mundy, expired in
September 1998 and a ...
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14. D VALUE KEY IN BREACHING DECISION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A decision on whether dam breaching
is necessary -- or whether increased barging of fish downriver would do
as well in recovering Snake River salmon populations -- could still swing
on what researchers can learn about smolt transportation's "D value."
Newer studies indicate that the D
value (differential delayed transportation mortality) is not as high as
was once thought, according to Chip McConnaha, manager of program and analysis
and evaluation for the Northwest Power Planning Council.
Read More...  

15. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
. Fyall, Hanford Reach
Coordinator, Benton County, Wa:
There are a couple of minor points
of clarification that I would like to add regarding the piece "HASTINGS
OFFERS MODIFIED HANFORD BILL" from the CBB of 15 May. First, the article
states that the new Murray-Dicks Congressional bills (S 715 and HR 1314)
include a "management council" as a new wrinkle. This is not true, and
is one of the clearest, most fundamental distinctions between the (Patty)
Murray and (Richard) Hastings ...
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