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Latest CBB News > Archives > May 14, 1999
May 14, 1999

1. TRIBAL DREW REPORT FAVORS BREACHING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Breaching the four lower Snake River dams is the only option that tribal
officials believe will result in a positive impact on Northwest Native
Americans.
Of the three main options being studied by the Corps of Engineers, Phil
Meyer, consultant for the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission,
said that only breaching the dams would result in fish recovery and that
fish recovery, not just fish survival, would result in economic benefits
to the tribes.
Meyer presented an overview ...
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2. MEMO PROPOSES ALTERNATE RATE CASE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Refined cost estimates show that two fish and wildlife alternatives
under serious consideration in the Federal Caucus and other processes in
the Columbia Basin will approach nearly $1 billion a year by the year
2011, say representatives of federal agencies in a May 12 memorandum to
the Bonneville Power Administration.
As a result, BPA is being asked to consider an alternative rate case
strategy that will build a large reserve beyond the rate case years
2002-2006.
The reserve -- ...
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3. HEARING TACKLES BPA LEGISLATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Four Northwest congressmen this week spoke as one in support of keeping
both the benefits and the burdens of federal power in their region and
against privatizing the Bonneville Power Administration.
But a Northwest environmental group urged Congress to reform BPA and
require it to increase its electric rates to increase spending for salmon
recovery and conservation and renewable energy programs.
Reps. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., Jim McDermott, D-Wash., and Doc Hastings
and George ...
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4. SLOW MELT FORCES AUGMENTATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Precious water held behind Grand Coulee and Dworshak dams is being released
to supplement Columbia and Snake river flows that are lower than expected
because lingering cool weather has slowed mountain snow melt.
Columbia Basin salmon and hydropower managers on Wednesday decided to
release more water, rather than beginning to refill the reservoirs.
If cool weather continues, the extra water will likely be needed to
meet flow targets prescribed in the National Marine Fisheries Service ...
Read More...  

5. IDFG: LOW SPRING CHINOOK RETURNS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Spring chinook runs into the Snake River are predicted to be the third
lowest on record, based on fish counts at the Bonneville Dam. At the same
time, runs of salmon in the lower river are predicted to be on the rise
this year.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game is predicting returns that wont even
give it half the number needed at Idaho hatcheries, while the Oregon Department
of Fish and Wildlife is forecasting a slight increase in runs of salmon
in the lower Columbia River.
Most of ...
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6. HATCHERY REPORT READIED FOR PUBLIC
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A report to Congress on Columbia River Basin hatchery practices is nearly
ready for the spotlight: the Northwest Power Planning Council on Tuesday
will decide whether the set of policy and implementation recommendations
is ready for public review.
The implementation section maps out a process for evaluating program
performance and deciding whether programs should be continued.
The report has been nearly a year and a half in the making. The Council
was directed in late 1997 to review ...
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7. WAHLUKE SLOPE PLAN DISCUSSED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A proposed study by the National Academy of Sciences of the north slope
of the Columbia River's Hanford Reach this week was opposed by federal
officials, who said it would delay management changes needed to protect
salmon.
A bill by Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., who supports development of some
of the so-called Wahluke Slope for irrigated agriculture, would mandate
a two-year study of potential land uses for the 90,000 acres and halt a
plan by Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson to have the
Read More...  

8. HASTINGS OFFERS MODIFIED HANFORD BILL
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., this week introduced a modified version
of his bill to transfer the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to state
ownership as a "national salmon preserve and recreation Area.
Washington state Democrats, who are pushing their own bill to designate
the 51-mile stretch as a national wild and scenic river, criticized the
measure, which is also opposed by the Clinton administration and environmental
groups.
Rep. Jay Inslee, D-Wash., a House Resources Committee ...
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9. BISHOPS ISSUE BASIN PASTORAL PAPER
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Diverse and contradictory possibilities appear for the Columbia River
region of the future, Catholic bishops say in a 65-page document that blames
the ill health of the watershed on "human ignorance, human carelessness,
human indifference and human greed."
The bishops, in a "pastoral reflection" titled "The Columbia River Watershed:
Realities and Possibilities," say the region faces two options: "economic
stability and ecological integrity and sustainability if people take seriously
their
Read More...  

10. INITIATIVE, BILL SEEK END TO NET FISHING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Saying that habitat doesnt stop at the waterline, an initiative petition
is being circulated in Washington state that would ban commercial gillnets
and other net fishing in Puget Sound and on the Columbia River. A bill
introduced in the 1999 Oregon legislature seeks similar protection of salmon
by also banning the nets.
Of both efforts to ban commercial net fishing, Steve Fick, president
of Salmon for All in Oregon, said the gillnet fishery is the most selective
and the most managed ...
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11. FRAMEWORK 'VISIONS' FINE-TUNED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Even though some questioned the process' ability to accomplish its own
goals, participants in a Columbia River Basin Multi-Species Framework dug
in this past week to make sure the process considered all fish and wildlife
management visions.
The Wednesday-Thursday workshop in Portland was designed as a brainstorming
activity to refine an established set of management strategies. The framework
process, launched last summer by the Northwest Power Planning Council,
aims to analyze the ...
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12. ALTERNATIVES' HUMAN EFFECTS SCRUTINIZED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A preliminary look at seven proposed Columbia River fish and wildlife
management alternatives gives only a glimpse of the potential costs --
some of which total billions of dollars -- and benefits to the humans that
live in the basin.
A "summary of human effects" completed in late April by contractor CH2M-Hill
emphasizes that the initial work is limited in scope. Because of gaps in
available data, the report provides a sketchy look at alternatives being
considered via the ...
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13. PLAN LOOKS AT NON-NATIVE FISH
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
An Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife plan to manage introduced
or non-native species of fish recommends using angling regulations, eradication,
incentives to anglers and commercial fisheries to control non-native species
where they are in conflict with native fish.
ODFW staff unveiled a draft plan to manage introduced or non-native
fish in Oregon at a Commission meeting in Salem this week. The plan and
its recommendations were designed to reduce the impact that non-native
species ...
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14. TALKS CONTINUE ON PESTICIDE REPORTING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Three Oregon environmental groups turned to Oregons initiative process
to put a pesticide reporting measure on the November Oregon ballot. The
groups filed last week to begin the initiative process after frustrations
that a similar Oregon legislative bill had not been heard.
However, this week talks picked up again in the Oregon Legislature on
compromises to House Bill 3602, the House version of the original pesticide
reporting bill, introduced by Rep. Vicki Walker. The environmental ...
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15. WHITE-TAIL DEER MAKES COMEBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to remove the Columbian
white-tailed deer in Douglas County, Ore. from the endangered species list
after a dramatic comeback.
Biologists estimated the deers population in Douglas County at less
than 500 in the early 1970s. More than 5,000 of the species now roam over
300 square miles of Douglas County, primarily in the lower portions of
the North Umpqua River.
The proposal is the result of two decades of work and partnering with
the ...
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16. WILLAMETTE RELEASES TO SUPPORT RECOVERY
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Endangered Species Act listings in the Willamette River will change
the way the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will operate dams on the river
this year.
The Corps will share with river users a new water management plan for
Willamette Valley lakes and rivers this month at planned water management
meetings.
The Corps announced that, because of the listing, it will release larger
than normal river flows during June from its projects on the Willamette.
It is doing this to support ...
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