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Latest CBB News > Archives > Apr 28, 2000
Apr 28, 2000

1. EPA GIVES CORPS' SNAKE RIVER EIS FAILING GRADE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study of what to do with four lower Snake
River dams does not adequately address the water quality impacts of
the
study's four alternatives, nor does it offer a strategy to comply with
water quality standards.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said in comments on the Corps'
draft Lower Snake River Juvenile Salmon Migration Feasibility Report
and
Environmental Impact Statement that the study is inadequate because
it
doesn't evaluate the impacts ...
Read More...  

68 degree temperature and 110 percent TDG standards."
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The EPA also accused the Corps of manipulating data when it came to
the
conclusion that the lower Snake River is cooler now than before the
dams
were built.
"We believe this conclusion results from selective use of data and
selective use of modeling results," Clarke wrote. "EPA water temperature
modeling clearly demonstrates that the dams cause water quality standard
exceedances almost on a daily basis during the hot part of the summer
by
inhibiting the diurnal water temperature ...
Read More...  

20 years, the river exceeded 68 degrees 64 or more days per year at
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Ice
Harbor dam, and seven of 20 years at Lower Granite Dam. The scroll
case
data showed exceedences like that in only three of the 20 years at
each
dam.
"The dams have resulted in significant change in the energy budget of
the lower Snake River," EPA says. "The instantaneous daily water
temperatures may be greater under some conditions in the natural river
than in the impounded river, but high water temperatures in the natural
river don't last as long seasonally as the high water ...
Read More...  

2. HOUSE COMMITTEE TAKES FEDS TO TASK AT PASCO
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Federal agencies' lack of progress in sorting out conflicting mandates,
and a meddlesome Clinton Administration, have brought into question
the
agencies' ability to make sound salmon recovery decisions, according
to
Northwest members of the U.S. House of Representatives Resources
committee.
A committee oversight hearing held Thursday in Pasco, Wash., to hear
testimony on "practical and incremental steps that can be taken over
the
near-term to recover endangered salmon" turned at ...
Read More...  

3. BREACHING IN OR OUT? NON-BREACHING PLAN ROLLS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Wide ranging suggestions on the near-term direction of Columbia Basin
salmon recovery efforts were offered Thursday by witnesses called to
testify at a U.S. House of Representatives Resources Committee hearing
in Pasco. All but a few said dam breaching should be dropped from
consideration.
Meanwhile, the federal agency at the front in efforts to address
Endangered Species Act issues is expected to prescribe an approach
that
withholds a breaching decision while it weighs aggressive ...
Read More...  

4. ECONOMIST URGES HARVEST, HATCHERY CHANGES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The smolt-to-adult return rate of Columbia Basin hatchery salmon and
steelhead have been declining during the 1990s, along with the adult
fish's value to fishers, according to natural resource economist Hans
Radtke.
The result has been a skyrocketing cost for producing each harvestable
hatchery fish.
That double-edged sword should force policy makers to rethink their
strategies both for hatchery operations and harvest management, Radtke
told the Northwest Power Planning Council ...
Read More...  

1972. He has worked on a variety of fish industry related projects
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
for
the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife the Pacific Fishery
Management Council, The Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Coastal
Zone Management Association. He is currently vice chairman of the PFMC.
Radtke detailed a variety of factors that have reduced the Columbia
Basin salmon economy to a shadow of its former self. At estimated
historic average runs sizes, the basin had the potential to net
fishermen $272 million in 1998 dollars at a 50 percent harvest rate.
That ...
Read More...  

1970s to the 1990s, suspected in large part to be the result of
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
worsening ocean conditions that hurt survival.
Survival estimates have shrunk from relatively banner years in the 1970s
and 1980s to Columbia Basin adult returns that amount to less than
one
per hundred smolts in the early 1990s (.9 percent for coho compared
to
2.72 percent in the 1980s, .22 percent for spring/summer chinook
compared to .69 percent, .30 for fall chinook compared to .49 percent
and .42 for steelhead compared to 1.38 percent).
Radtke notes that that there has been no ...
Read More...  

5. COLUMBIA BASN FORUM EYEBALLS HARVEST POLICIES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Harvest of salmon in the Columbia River is at the lowest allowed level
ever. Further changes to harvest rates would not add significantly
to
salmon recovery.
Members of the Columbia River Basin Forum, meeting last week, generally
agreed with these statements. (The Forum is attended by representatives
of Northwest governor's offices, tribal governments, and federal and
state agencies.)
Yet, fishing continues to be culturally important to Northwesterners
and
for political reasons ...
Read More...  

6. FATE OF TERNS HINGES ON COURT DECISION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A plan to move Caspian terns in the Columbia River estuary remained
in
limbo this week while parties battled in court over whether a full
environmental impact statement is required to proceed with the plan.
Of
particular issue is a part of the plan that calls for harassing the
birds at Rice Island to discourage them from nesting.
Two weeks ago, a District Court in Seattle put a temporary injunction
on
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' plan to actively harass the terns.
The
U.S. ...
Read More...  

7. BPA'S BODI STRESSES PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Northwest can neither morally or legally allow salmon to go extinct.
This is one of the most difficult challenges facing the region and
the
region will be remembered for how well it does.
This is one of the conclusions Lori Bodi, senior policy advisor for
fish
and wildlife at the Bonneville Power Administration, offered to a
gathering of lawyers, students and salmon policy people at this week's
Northwest Water Law & Policy Project fifth annual conference in
Portland.
The ...
Read More...  

8. SALMON CARCASS NUTRIENT STUDY APPROVED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A National Marine Fisheries Service study to determine the benefits
for
rearing salmon and steelhead from nutrients deposited via carcasses
of
spawned out adults has earned a funding green light.
The Northwest Power Planning Council on Wednesday recommended that the
Bonneville Power Administration allocate $105,000 to complete a nutrient
utilization study begun by NMFS last year. The approval came despite
reservations that the project's study design had not been ...
Read More...  

9. THOUSANDS OF ACRES COULD BE ADDED TO ESTUARY WETLANDS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Several efforts are in the works to purchase and set aside more wetlands
in the Columbia River estuary, but will those purchases count towards
a
mitigation requirement set by the National Marine Fisheries Service
for
a river channel deepening project?
If Debrah Marriott, executive director of the Lower Columbia River
Estuary Program (LCREP) gets her wish, the efforts would be additive,
which could result in thousands of acres of new habitat being added
to
the estuary in the next ...
Read More...  

2000 against NMFS, saying the agency's biological opinion of the
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
controversial channel deepening project lacked scientific foundation
and
could harm juvenile salmon traveling through the river's estuary. While
the results of the suit may be unknown at this time, other efforts
to
purchase estuary lands are moving forward.
The Columbia Land Trust, a non-profit organization located in Vancouver,
Wash. recently received $999,000 from U.S. Fish and Wildlife and $6.1
million in matching money, which it will use to purchase about 1,500
acres of wetlands and
Read More...  

10. ICBEMP PREFERRED ALTERNATIVE GETS LOCAL REVIEWS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Local forest planners are looking for the devil in the detail of a
restoration plan that covers 62 million acres of federal lands in the
Columbia Basin.
But some who got a taste of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem
Management Project last week think they've already found the devil,
and
it's not necessarily in the detail.
"One of the big concerns is all the overlapping of all these issues
and
initiatives," said Chuck Samuelson of Montanans for Multiple Use. "I
don't know how they're
Read More...  

10 years.
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
It calls for preserving and expanding habitat types that are currently
in short supply. It recommends protections for areas that are unroaded,
and old growth stands that have dwindled by as much as 80 percent,
for
some species, over the last 150 years.
It projects a basin-wide 21 percent increase in merchantable timber
harvests, but just an 8 percent increase in western Montana, where
there
are wet forest types that provide habitat for creatures such as the
recently listed lynx. It ...
Read More...  

11. SUBBASIN ASSESSMENT NEEDS DISCUSSED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
If a collaboratively developed subbasin assessment template is to answer
the needs of all involved in Columbia Basin fish and wildlife recovery,
it will have to stand broader scrutiny than has so far been prescribed,
or funded.
"We do feel strongly that the use of three analytical tools is essential
to provide planners" with the necessary assessment information for
both
Endangered Species Act recovery planning and hydrosystem mitigation
responsibilities, according to Dr. Robert Bilby ...
Read More...  

12. BASIN BRIEFS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
-- Spring Chinook Count At Bonneville Stays High
The tally of adult spring chinook at Bonneville Dam is the largest in
more than 20 years for this date. The high fish counts could add up
to
one of the best years for Columbia River spring salmon since the strong
returns of the 1970s, says a Bonneville Power Administration press
release.
Scientists say Mother Nature has cooled down parts of the Pacific Ocean
where these fish mature, increasing the odds of survival for the fish.
An ...
Read More...  

 

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