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Latest CBB News > Archives > Apr 7, 2000
Apr 7, 2000

1. JUDGE RULES CORPS MUST COMPLY WITH CWA
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers must comply with the Clean Water Act
when operating the four lower Snake River dams, U.S. District Court
Judge Helen Frye ruled recently.
But the court put off its decision whether the Corps has actually
violated the CWA until administrative records can be reviewed.
According to environmentalists, the ruling could signal a change in
the
way the Corps operates all dams under its control, including twenty-some
dams in the Columbia River system. The ...
Read More...  

2. BABBITT: NO DAM DECISION ON MY WATCH
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Secretary of Interior Bruce Babbitt this week said a regional Fish and
Wildlife Service official's comments in support of breaching four lower
Snake River dams does not reflect his views.
During a press conference in December in Portland by members of the
Federal Caucus to unveil their All-H Paper on salmon recovery options,
Fish and Wildlife Service Northwest regional director Ann Badgley said
the "bottom-line, biological conclusion is really a no-brainer. For
native fish and wildlife, a
Read More...  

3. TERN HARASSMENT TO BEGIN NEXT WEEK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Active harassment of what may be the largest colony of Caspian terns
in
the world will begin next week in an attempt to move the birds closer
to
feeding grounds where they will feast less on juvenile salmon and more
on other marine species.
A plan developed by the multi-agency Caspian Tern Working Group was
set
in motion last week and will continue through the terns nesting season
-- April to July. The plan is aimed at relocating all 16,000 terns
from
Rice Island, five miles up ...
Read More...  

300 of those eggs. Caspian terns are protected under the federal
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Migratory Bird Act and fall under the care of Fish and Wildlife.
Although Dan Roby, an associate professor at Oregon State University
and
working group member, told the Northwest Power Planning Council in
mid-March that the eggs would be destroyed, Rabe said they will not
be
destroyed, but will be used instead for research.
The working group expects some terns to also nest outside the estuary
in
areas along the Washington coast, such as in Willapa Bay or Grays
Harbor. In fact, ...
Read More...  

4. SCIENTISTS STRESS ACTION FOR LOOMING FISH EXTINCTIONS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Federal scientists conclude that drastic action must be taken soon to
head off extinction for Columbia Basin salmon runs in the worst shape,
and decision-makers must take that plunge without the certainty that
those actions will work.
During a March 29 workshop co-sponsored by National Marine Fisheries
Service, scientists stressed that the peril faced by certain salmon
and
steelhead populations demand immediate action -- action that cannot
be
delayed until numerous biological ...
Read More...  

5. JOHANSEN: UNSPENT $180 MILLION NEEDS REGIONAL
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Bonneville Power Administration's top official admitted Tuesday
that
ESA-spawned mandates may increase immediate Columbia Basin fish and
wildlife program needs, but she showed a reluctance to juggle funds
from
one account to another to answer those needs.
In a discussion with the Northwest Power Planning Council, BPA
administrator Judi Johansen noted a growing debate "about the so-called
$180 million" that was budgeted, but so far has not been spent, to
repay
Treasury loans for ...
Read More...  

6. PORTLAND HARBOR HEADS FOR SUPERFUND LISTING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency asked Oregon Gov. John
Kitzhaber this week for his concurrence to list the Portland harbor
as a
Superfund site. The letter from EPA Region 10 Director Chuck Clarke
was
sent to the governor after the state missed its deadline last week
to
get a state deferral and avoid the listing.
Polluters, government and tribes were unable to arrive at an agreement
by the March 31, 2000 deadline on how to clean up 5.5 miles of the
Willamette River in the ...
Read More...  

7. COUNTIES, GROUPS CHALLENGE CONDIT SETTLEMENT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Those not involved in crafting a negotiated settlement calling for the
removal of southwest Washington's Condit Dam would like to have their
say before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission passes judgment
on
the proposal.
FERC is now considering a request from PacifiCorp, the hydropower
project's owner-operator, to extend the term of its license through
Oct.
Read More...  

1, 2006, subject to the terms of a settlement agreement reached last
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
year in negotiations among state and federal agencies, the Yakama Indian
Nation, and several conservation and sportsmen's groups.
The September agreement is intended to allow the power company to
continue operations for the next seven years to generate funds to offset
dam removal costs, which are not to exceed $17.15 million. Condit
provides 14 megawatts of electricity, enough to serve about 13,000
customers, according to PacifiCorp.
As FERC moves toward a decision, numerous local ...
Read More...  

8. CONGRESS CONSIDERS DAM RE-LICENSING BILLS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Federal fisheries and land management agencies have too much power to
delay and dictate conditions for re-licensing hydropower projects,
Northwest and other utilities have told congressional committees.
House and Senate bills to streamline the Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission's re-licensing process were supported by Portland-based
PacifiCorp, American Public Power Association, and others at a hearing
on March 30 by the House Energy and Power Subcommittee. But the
legislation was ...
Read More...  

9. COUNCIL SUPPORTS FEDS FISH APPROPRIATION NEEDS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
With federal Columbia Basin salmon recovery decisions looming, the
four-state Northwest Power Planning Council plans to submit testimony
asking for congressional appropriations that are sufficient funding
to
carry out past and potential federal fish and wildlife related mandates.
The Council's funding recommendations for federal fish and wildlife
recovery activities mirror in many instances the Clinton
Administration's budget requests for fiscal year 2001. In other cases
it
says the ...
Read More...  

10 reform recommendations as well as six strategies for implementing
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
the
policies.
The requested new $1 million budget line items should be used for
completion of Hatchery Genetic Management Plans and monitoring and
activities consistent with the APR recommendations, according to the
Council testimony.
The Council also asks that the Mitchell Act hatchery program funding
be
increased from the Administration's 2001 request of $15.2 million to
$16.307 million. The administration request targets $11.4 million for
hatchery operations, $3.365 million for ...
Read More...  

10. NEW FISH MONITORING FACILITY OPENS AT BONNEVILLE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Biologists at the Bonneville Dam in March began monitoring passage of
juvenile salmon and steelhead from a modern new facility near North
Bonneville, Wash. From the facility, biologists will be able to rate
the
success of fish passage improvements at the dam as well as changes
in
river operations on downstream migrants.
The juvenile fish monitoring facilitys completion follows changes to
bypass and outfall facilities at the dams second powerhouse. The U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers ...
Read More...  

13 percent. In all, the improvements cost $62 million.
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Fish passage was considered poor at the dams second powerhouse. One
improvement recommended by the National Marine Fisheries Service in
its
Read More...  

1995 biological opinion for operation of the Columbia River power system
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
was to relocate the dams juvenile outfalls to an area with higher
velocity water. Predators, such as pikeminnows, cant feed as
efficiently on the downstream migrants in faster water.
So, the Corps completed a two-mile juvenile bypass outfall flume and
put
it into service last year in March. At the same time, it improved the
bypass facilities at the second powerhouse, something the Corps says
helps juvenile fish pass through the dam more easily.
NMFS performed onsite tests at a ...
Read More...  

11. NMFS SUGGESTS PASSAGE AND SPILL CHANGES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
As the first spill of the juvenile salmon outmigration season began
in
early April at Lower Snake dams, the National Marine Fisheries Service
and federal operating agencies are considering spill changes at other
dams in the Columbia River hydroelectric system.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began spill to aid juvenile fish
passage April 4 at Ice Harbor and Lower Monumental dams on the lower
Snake River, Cindy Henriksen of the Corps told the multi-agency
Implementation Team this ...
Read More...  

12. SENATORS BLAST FRAMPTON ON ROADLESS ACRES PROCESS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Forest Service's rulemaking process to protect 40 million to 54
million acres of roadless areas is "fatally tainted," according to
Sen.
Larry Craig, R-Idaho, chairman of the Forests and Public Land Management
Subcommittee.
"I fear you have a rogue agency on your hands," Craig told President
Clinton's chief environmental advisor, George Frampton, at a March
30
hearing on the issue.
Craig predicted the administration ultimately will have to defend the
rulemaking, which Clinton ...
Read More...  

1997. "This is the mandate of American citizens," he said. "It should
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
be
no surprise to anybody."
Also, Rait said public still has a chance to influence critical details
of the roadless area protection plan that remain to be fleshed out
in
the Forest Service EIS. "Protecting roadless areas can mean a thousand
different things to a thousand different people," he said.
Among the decisions to be made are whether to ban helicopter and other
logging, mining and off-road recreational vehicle use and whether to
exempt certain national forests from the ...
Read More...  

13. TRIBES VOTE TO CO-OWN CENTRAL OREGON DAMS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Members of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs voted last week
by a large margin to pursue joint-ownership of the Pelton-Round Butte
hydroelectric project now owned solely by Portland General Electric.
Tribal members voted 753 to 127 in a referendum vote to spend as much
as
$90 million to gradually buy a percentage of two dams and to share
in
the hydroelectric project operations. The arrangement settles a
long-standing dispute between PGE and the Warm Springs Tribes ...
Read More...  

14. COUNCILS AMENDMENT PROCESS CONCERNS ADDRESSED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Columbia Basin fish and wildlife program amendment process took
on a
new turn this week with a Northwest Power Planning Council decision
to
foster calls for "high priority" projects that could win approval as
early as next fall.
The Council shifted gears Wednesday by responding to a "gathering
regional interest in identifying, funding and implementing a package
of
high priority habitat and other fish and wildlife actions on a faster
time scale," according to a draft letter ...
Read More...  

2000 project selection process, set aside $1 million to be used for
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
the
subbasin assessment-planning process.
The funding will be used in part to organize meetings in each of the
10
geographical "provinces" defined during the Multi-Species Framework
process. Those meetings will be used to collect subbasin data specified
in the subbasin template now being developed by the states, federal
agencies and tribes. A draft is now being reviewed.
The National Marine Fisheries Service's Elizabeth Gaar pointed out that
other analytical methods should be ...
Read More...  

15. BASIN BRIEFS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
-- Washington Awards Funds for Salmon Recovery Projects
Some $13.34 million in grants were awarded to 84 projects that will
help
restore salmon in Washington. The states Salmon Recovery Funding Board
awarded the money in its first round of funding for projects that focus
on improving or setting aside habitat that will aid in salmon recovery.
Of the 84 projects funded, 20 will benefit the Columbia River system
in
Chelan County, Klickitat County, Pacific County and the lower ...
Read More...  

201 North Third Avenue, Walla Walla, WA 99362, or by faxing comments
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
to
(509) 527-7832.
For more information on the Corps' Lower Snake River FR/EIS visit
www.nww.usace.army.mil. *
-- Bonneville Hatchery Takes Action to Prevent Heron Deaths
Hatchery personnel removed protective netting covering several ponds
at
Bonneville Hatchery to prevent the death of any more great blue herons
feeding on juvenile steelhead.
More than 100 herons have died since last spring, according to Oregon
Department of Fish and Wildlife Hatchery Manager Scott Lusted. ...
Read More...  

1998 to fewer than 1,000 today.
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Fire suppression is the primary reason for the loss of habitat because
it allows forests to spread into meadows where the species lives,
she
said. But other threats include land conversion, agricultural and
residential development and loss of open corridors between remaining
populations.
Idaho already recognizes the squirrel as a species of concern. Fish
and
Wildlife is working with Idaho Fish and Game, the U.S. Forest Service
and a private landowner to protect the species.*
Read More...  

16. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
, Director of Public Relations, Washington Farm Bureau:
The latest Columbia Basin Bulletin repeats a fraud perpetrated on the
public by the National Marine Fisheries Service.
According to the newsletter, "A court-ordered settlement requires NMFS
to issue a final 4(d) rule for steelhead no later than June 19, 2000."
There is no court order directing NMFS to adopt any rules by June 19.
A year ago, NMFS was sued by four environmental groups for not having
adopted 4(d) rules for ...
Read More...  

 

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