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Latest CBB News > Archives > Mar 12, 1999
Mar 12, 1999

1. FLOW ADOPTED TO REDUCE HANFORD STRANDING
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
While not specifically endorsing the plan, fish managers agreed that
hydro managers' proposed Mid-Columbia flow regime for Hanford Reach could
result in reduced entrapment and mortality of juvenile fall chinook fry
this spring.

The hydro managers last week (Friday, March 5) presented the one-season
flow regime to fish managers as a take-it-or-leave-it proposal, stressing
they needed a plan in place this week when fry are expected to emerge from
Hanford Reach redds.

The fry rear ...
Read More...  

2. REC REPORT RELEASE DRAWS SHARP REACTION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Army Corps of Engineers reacted strongly last week to environmental
groups' release of information about potential recreation benefits resulting
from the breaching four lower Snake River dams.

The Sierra Club, Save Our Wild Salmon, Trout Unlimited and the NW Sportfishing
Industry Association all claimed that a preliminary economic report put
recreational benefits of removing the four dams in the billions of dollars.
The information, they said, came from their reading of a ...
Read More...  

3. APPEALS COURT BACKS NMFS BIOP
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Assertions that federal agencies violated terms of the Endangered Species
Act with actions related to a 1995 Biological Opinion for Snake River salmon
were rebuffed Monday by the Ninth U.S. Court of Appeals.

The BiOp outlines both short- and long-term measures designed to avoid
putting listed species at risk of extinction. It addresses the fate of
Snake River sockeye, spring/summer chinook and fall chinook salmon.

A goal set out in the BiOp was to decide this year on a long-term ...
Read More...  

4. IDAHO JOINS BASIN FORUM PROCESS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Another player was penciled onto the roster of the newly-created Columbia
River Basin Forum Wednesday with the announcement that the state of Idaho
will take an official role in the process.

The state held back in late January when other "parties" decided
to proceed with formation of the organization as a platform for discussions
on Basin fish and wildlife management issues. Four state governments, 13
Indian tribes and nine federal government entities are listed in the ...
Read More...  

5. FORUM WONDERS ABOUT FEDS, FRAMEWORK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Reaching agreement on the direction for federal, state and tribal fish
and wildlife restoration efforts is a complicated business -- a fact that
surfaced early in discussions of the fledgling Columbia River Basin Forum.

The first gathering of the Forum's 12-member committee Wednesday in
Portland showed various entities are on similar, though not necessarily
coordinated, tracks toward a common goal of producing a unified, basinwide
recovery plan.

The Forum's founding document ...
Read More...  

6. IDAHO F&G COMMISSION OUSTS MEALEY
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Idaho Fish and Game Commission fired embattled director Stephen
P. Mealey late last week in a controversial 4-3 vote.

The move invoked an almost immediate retaliation from Idaho state legislators
who killed a bill that would have helped to bail out the cash-strapped
agency.

Mealey also reacted quickly by challenging the firing, initially done
in executive session and later in an open meeting, by hiring former Idaho
Lt. Gov. David Leroy of Boise and suing the ...
Read More...  

7. LAWMAKERS EYE NEW IDAHO ESA OFFICE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
When it comes to salmon recovery, The Idaho Fish and Game Commission
would play second fiddle to an Office of Threatened and Endangered Species
under a measure introduced last week in the state House of Representatives
wins favor.

The bill, recommended for passage Wednesday by the House Resources and
Conservation Committee, would create a three-person species office within
the Office of the Governor.

The office's director "shall be the official in the state designated
to oversee
Read More...  

8. LEGISLATURE PANS BREACHING IDEA
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A measure that passed overwhelmingly in the Idaho House of Representatives
would put the Legislature on record as opposing any dam breaching on the
Snake River in the effort to restore salmon and steelhead populations.

The resolution, now under consideration in the Senate, also would prohibit
the use of water from Idaho reservoirs for flow augmentation, except as
authorized by the state. Such augmentation has been used in attempts to
improve passage for migrating salmon through the ...
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9. CRITFC'S STRONG DISCUSSES SALMON ISSUES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
At the end of this month, Ted Strong will step down as executive director
of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. He will have served
in that position for 10 years, or nearly half of the organization's existence.


The following are excerpts from an interview published in the Yakama
Nation Review in which Strong discusses key issues related to salmon restoration.
(For the views for incoming CRITFC director Don Sampson, see CBB, March
1-5)

On Restoration and Declining ...
Read More...  

10. HANFORD BLUFF PROTECTIONS SOUGHT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A Washington congressman has proposed legislation to, ultimately, shore
up sloughing bluffs that pose a threat to water quality and fisheries along
the Columbia River's productive Hanford Reach.

"Last Congress we hit a roadblock and no agreement was struck on
how best to protect the lands surrounding the Hanford Reach -- including
the White Bluffs and Wahluke Slope," said Rep. Doc Hastings. "If
we know these lands are sloughing into the river, common sense tells ...
Read More...  

11. FLOW AUGMENTATION REPORT PROMISED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Available information on the benefits of flow augmentation to migrating
juvenile salmon and steelhead on the Snake and Columbia Rivers will be
compiled in a report due for completion in June. The report is an attempt
to answer an Idaho Governor's Office request for better justification of
the practice as a salmon recovery measure.

At a Feb. 4 meeting of NMFS's multi-agency Implementation Team, Gov.
Dirk Kempthorne's natural resources adviser Jim Yost asked for an explanation
of the ...
Read More...  

12. REPORT LOOKS AT PESTICIDE-SALMON LINK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Water polluted with pesticides could be a major contributor to the decline
of salmon in the Northwest, according to a new report by fisheries biologist
Richard Ewing, Ph.D.

The report, "Diminishing Returns: Salmon Decline and Pesticides,"
says that scientists and policymakers have overlooked the role that pesticide-caused
water pollution has had on the decline of salmon. The report lists several
ways that pesticides affect salmon and offers seven recommendations ...
Read More...  

13. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
. Booker, CPA , mebooker@atnet.net:

Kudos to Ed Woodruff for clearly identifying THE FIRST GORILLA of Snake
River dam removal - The cost to replace power after the dams are removed.

The Columbia Basin Bulletin, 2/26, Part 2 of 2, 7. DRAWDOWN COST ESTIMATE
INCREASED, the third paragraph stated: "The hydropower impact is now
estimated at $251 million to $291 million on an average annual basis using
a medium forecast, which is the most likely outcome," said Ed ...
Read More...  

 

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