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Latest CBB News > Archives > Feb 19, 1999
Feb 19, 1999

1. BPA MAKES CASE ON REVENUES LOST TO SPILL
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Under a worst-case economic scenario, the Bonneville Power Administration
stands to lose an estimated $38 million during testing this summer that
is intended to determine what level of spill provides the most benefit
for migrating juvenile salmon.

Power generation -- and revenue -- are lost when river operators must
spill water through spillways rather than turbines in order to help move
young fish through the Columbia-Snake river hydroelectric system.

Those shifts in power production
Read More...  

2. AGREEMENT ELUSIVE ON JOHN DAY 24-HOUR SPILL PLAN
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Regional fish and hydro managers are trying to work out a study plan
for 24-hour spill tests at John Day Dam this spring.

The National Marine Fisheries Service 1995 and 1998 Biological Opinions
(BiOps) ask for consensus, or at least coordination, among regional interests
on the study design.

The Bonneville Power Administration opposes spill options for economic
reasons (see Story No. 1 above) and questions the technical details of
the study.

"What is the objective of ...
Read More...  

3. SAMPSON PICKED TO LEAD CRITFC
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Representatives of the Lower Columbia River treaty tribes picked one
from their own ranks Thursday afternoon to follow Ted Strong as executive
director of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission.

Don Sampson, now CRITFC's watershed department manager, was selected
to CRITFC's top post during the commission's February meeting. Strong decided
late last year to step down after nearly 10 years on the job.

Sampson sees his new role as helping to push salmon recovery off ...
Read More...  

4. PATH SCIENTISTS TO ADDRESS KEY QUESTIONS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
More than 100 questions regarding the Plan for Analysis and Testing
Hypotheses (PATH) have been distilled into eight categories of questions
to be addressed by PATH scientists at an all-day public meeting next week.

Meanwhile, while PATH's work focuses on the hydropower system, the Northwest
congressional delegation is considering sending a letter to the Northwest
Power Planning Council that would urge the Council to develop a draft "non-drawdown"
salmon recovery alternative to
Read More...  

5. JOHN DAY DRAWDOWN: COSTS VS. CHANCE OF SUCCESS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A "scoping" study now under way intends to compare the potential
costs related to John Day Dam drawdown with the chances such measures would
help revive dwindling salmon runs.

Those comparisons are expected to form a recommendation to Congress
-- either to drop the issue altogether or investigate drawdown options
in greater detail and at much greater cost.

"It's going to have to be a black and white answer" project
manager Stuart Stanger said of the study's ...
Read More...  

6. OCEAN RESEARCH GRANT TARGETS AILING FISHERIES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A $17.7 million grant award announced last week will allow researchers
from Oregon State University and three other institutions to study coastal
ecosystems on an unprecedented scale.

The goal is to produce information that may eventually help answer questions
about the causes of declining salmon populations and collapsing fisheries,
zooplankton survival and potential biological impacts of global warming.

The grant is largest ever made to a university by the David and ...
Read More...  

7. ESTUARY PROGRAM RELEASES MANAGEMENT PLAN
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Noting that most of the attention has been on the Columbia River above
Bonneville Dam, the Lower Columbia River Estuary Program (LCREP) recently
released a draft management plan for the Columbia River estuary.

LCREP defines the estuary as the section of river influenced by tidal
action, which includes river from the mouth to Bonneville Dam.

The management plan, out for public review until March 31, took three
years and the efforts of local governments, state and federal ...
Read More...  

8. WAYWARD WOLF CROSSES SNAKE INTO OREGON
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A lone gray wolf from Idaho apparently crossed the Snake River and is
moving through northeast Oregon in search of a mate.

The federally endangered wolf, number B-45, has a radio collar allowing
biologists to track it day to day while they consider their options.

The female gray wolf was captured and collared as a yearling and was
part of the Jureano Mountains Pack of east-central Idaho.

"She presents a somewhat odd situation for us because Oregon is
not part of the wolf ...
Read More...  

9. BASIN HATCHERY POLICY PROPOSALS TAKE SHAPE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
An evolving "policy framework" for Columbia Basin artificial
production activities contains a long list of regional "shalls"
and "shall nots" but stresses that specific reforms would have
to be implemented on a case-by-case basis.

"The decisions on what you actually do happen at the subbasin level,"
said John Marsh, the Northwest Power Planning Council's habitat and conservation
manager. He's also chairman for the Artificial Production Review ...
Read More...  

10. DAM BREACHING IDEA DRAWS CROWD'S WRATH
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
One-by-one, legislators and citizens marched to stage in the Tri-Cities
Thursday evening to denounce the notion that dam breaching is a viable
tool for restoring Snake River salmon and steelhead runs.

Several hundred people, including local, state and federal lawmakers,
gathered in southeast Washington at a rally staged to protest an ongoing
analysis of several strategies for improving salmon survival. The event
was broadcast live locally on radio.

The Corps of Engineers is ...
Read More...  

11. SALMON TREATY TALKS "POSITIVE," INCONCLUSIVE
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Pacific Salmon Commission met in Portland this month to attempt
to resolve the six-year impasse in the Pacific Salmon Treaty between the
United States and Canada.

The low-profile talks produced "positive signs that both sides
want to make something happen," said Bernie Bohn, Commission member
and assistant chief of the fisheries division of the Oregon Department
of Fish and Wildlife.

The 1985 treaty was intended to provide a mechanism to regulate ...
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12. CULTURAL RESOURCES SURVEYED AT FEDERAL DAMS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
No more than a square yard on the ground, and often just a few inches
deep, cultural resource sites around Hungry Horse Reservoir provide a glimpse
into the region's prehistoric past.

There often is nothing more than "scatters" or rock chips,
distinctly created by the hand of ancient man in building a tool, said
Flathead National Forest's archaeologist Tim Light.

Out of 17 sites discovered so far around the reservoir, some have produced
arrowheads, stone knives or other ...
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13. FEEDBACK
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
, mainstem hydrologist, Columbia River Inter-Tribal
Fish Commission:

Re: Feb. 12 CBB article titled "ESTUARY GOVERNMENTS OPPOSE CHANNEL
DEEPENING"

The statement was made "They were supposed to have evaluated dredging
to 41, 42 and 43 feet, a regional port alternative, as well as look at
nonstructural alternatives, such as upgrading the river forecasting system,"
Taylor said. "By its own economic study, upgrading the river forecasting
system is cheaper, ...
Read More...  

 

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