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Latest CBB News > Archives > Feb 5, 1999
Feb 5, 1999

1. BASIN FORUM MOVES AHEAD DESPITE HOLDOUTS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A "good faith" effort to create a new regional forum for coordinating
Columbia River Basin fish and wildlife management activities will move
ahead despite a failed first attempt at unanimity.

The Columbia River Basin Forum became official last Friday (Jan. 29)
after 14 of 23 entities -- states, federal agencies and Indian tribes --
involved in Basin fish and wildlife management signed a memorandum of agreement.
Another six parties, including the Yakama Indian Nation and the ...
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2. $100 MILLION REQUESTED FOR CORPS FISH PROGRAM
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The Clinton Administration has requested that $100 million be appropriated
by Congress in Fiscal Year 2000 to fund Army Corps of Engineers projects
aimed at improving salmon survival through the federal Columbia-Snake river
hydroelectric system.

President Clinton's fiscal year 2000 budget devotes $41 million to structural
improvements at dams to aid adult and juvenile fish passage and $59 million
to continue studies and evaluations for long-term passage improvements
-- including ...
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3. REPORT COMPARES, CONTRASTS SALMON SCIENCE VIEWS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The most complex, expensive elements of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife
restoration efforts are also the areas that carry the most unsettled scientific
arguments, according to a report released this week.

"Looking for Common Ground" is an attempt to identify areas
of agreement and of disagreement in five major scientific reports released
in recent years. A briefing on the Independent Scientific Advisory Board
"work-in-progress report" was presented to the ...
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4. IDAHO ISSUES WARNING ON FLOW AUGMENTATION
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Jim Yost, natural resources advisor to Idaho's new Gov. Dirk Kempthorne,
warned the region Thursday that Idaho may soon shut off Upper Snake River
water used to augment flows for salmon.

At the Feb. 4 meeting of the Regional Forum's Implementation Team, Yost
asked for an explanation of the biological benefits of the additional flow.


"We've been asking for this information for four years," he
said. "How am I going to go back to Idaho and explain how we're going
to ...
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5. SCIENTIST DETAILS IMPACT OF OCEAN CONDITIONS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
A "progressive intensification" of unfriendly ocean conditions
during the 1990s is more to blame for vanishing salmon and steelhead stocks
than all the harvest, habitat, hydroelectric and hatchery impacts combined,
according to a Canadian researcher.

"We have gone from having an El Nino every five to seven years,"
to having one nearly every year, said scientist David Welch of Canada's
Department of Oceans and Fisheries Pacific Biological Station at ...
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6. COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN TO TEST OLD HARVEST METHOD
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Commercial salmon fishermen in the Columbia River estuary want to experiment
with fishing techniques used by fishermen in the past to find ways to be
more selective in the types of fish they take from their nets.

If the experiment works, fishermen hope it will help avoid shortened
or closed commercial fishing seasons in the future.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with gillnet fishermen
in the Astoria area, plan this year an experiment that uses beach ...
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7. SPILL WAIVER GRANTED FOR HATCHERY TULES
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Spring Creek hatchery "tules" - a fall chinook stock that
originated in the Big White Salmon River - will get a boost in spill over
the Bonneville Dam this spring.

Last Friday (Jan. 29), the Oregon Environmental Quality Commission granted
a waiver of the water quality standard for dissolved gas below Bonneville
to allow spill for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hatchery release.

Last year the waiver was denied. The Commission "got more information
from the fish ...
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8. NMFS RESEARCH SHOWS LESS GAS FROM 1998 SPILL
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Dissolved gas levels in the Columbia River caused by spill decreased
slightly in 1998, the National Marine Fisheries Service reports.

The decrease is attributed to lower precipitation compared to 1996 and
1997, and to modifications of spillways at Ice Harbor and John Day dams.
Biological monitoring found few signs of gas bubble disease in fish throughout
the year.

NMFS summarized total dissolved gas supersaturation (TDGS) data in a
report on its 1998 spill program submitted last month
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9. WHEAT SOWN TO TURN AWAY TERNS
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The seeds have pretty much been sown and now scientists will wait to
see if their recently hatched plan will deter Caspian terns from their
favored nesting ground -- and their favorite food.

On Wednesday, Army Corps of Engineers, National Marine Fisheries Service
and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials gave an update on the tern
relocation project to the Northwest Power Planning Council. The Council
last year approved the expenditure of $235,000 from its 1999 direct fish
and ...
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10. FRAMEWORK BUDGET SOURCES CONSIDERED
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
The development of a multi-species framework to guide management of
Columbia Basin fish and wildlife enters a critical stretch with the selection
of policy alternatives expected to be made over the next two weeks.

Also crucial is the pursuit of budget dollars to fund completion of
the work -- estimated to cost $1.7 million. The project, launched last
year by the Northwest Power Planning Council, is expected to culminate
at summer's end with refined biological and social/economic/cultural
Read More...  

11. GROUPS SEEK HALT TO EAST OREGON AG PROJECT
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 (PST)
Environmental groups concerned about the rapid conversion of natural
shrub steppe and grassland habitat to farmland along the Columbia River
filed separate actions to stop the development of 2,800 acres of state
land near Boardman, Ore.

Defenders of Wildlife, the Northwest Environmental Defense Council and
the Oregon Natural Desert Association last month filed with the Oregon
Department of Fish and Wildlife an emergency endangered species listing
for the Washington ground squirrel, ...
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin, Bend, Oregon. For information or comments call 541-312-8860.
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